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Case Analysis

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Case Analysis Pin It 1. Jonas is 18 and recently finished high school. He lives at home with his mom and dad. While collecting dirty laundry in his room one day, Jonas’ mother discovered some of Jonas’ clothing with dried blood on them. She also found a bloody survival knife and muddy boots under his bed, as well as a bracelet that said “Lynn.” A few days earlier, police had discovered the missing body of Jonas’ high school sweetheart, Lynn, in the woods. Lynn had recently broken up with him. The medical examiner had determined that Lynn had died from repeated stabbing. When Jonas had been questioned by the police at the station, he claimed he knew nothing of the incident, and the police have no evidence tying Jonas to the disappearance or murder. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of murder, or due process issues for example.) 2. District Attorney Schultz has brought charges against three players of the University football team. They have been charged with raping a stripper at a party attended by team members. The case has received much publicity and the media have discovered that the three players have a history of violence towards women. (Last year, two other women claimed they had been raped, but the cell phone video showing the forced sex had been excluded based on an illegal police search, and the players were found "not guilty.”) Shultz believes these players are guilty, and has given approximately 60 media interviews on the case. Schultz has also been campaigning for reelection, and a conviction here would go a long way. Unfortunately for Schultz, the DNA tests he ran do not match any of the three players to the victim’s assault. When he questioned her about this, the victim made contradictory statements, and she had no other evidence to corroborate the events. In fact, while her statements confirm that they raped her, she admitted to having consensual sex with two other men at the party, which weakens the case. Schultz decides to not tell anyone about the DNA results unless asked, and instructs the victim/witness to deny the other sexual encounters at trial. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of rape or due process issues for example.) Assuming that Schultz had a strong belief that the defendants were guilty, include in your analysis whether this affects the moral and legal permissibility of his conduct. 3. Michelle worked two jobs as a security guard in Phoenix, Arizona. She was walking outside the building where she works at 6:30 AM, Monday, when two bundles of money fell out of an armored truck en route to a bank. Inside the bundles was approximately $500,000. Michelle had an inheritance that would post to her bank account on Wednesday. She decides to take the day off and head to Las Vegas to play poker. Unfortunately, Michelle lost all of the money she gambled, but luckily, as expected, on Wednesday, her inheritance was paid. Michelle turned all of the $500,000 in to the FBI on Thursday morning, three days after finding it. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of theft, conversion, or torts.) Include in your analysis whether Michelle was morally obligated to return the money. Should Michelle be penalized for using the money or for waiting three days to return the money? Case Analysis Pin It 1. Jonas is 18 and recently finished high school. He lives at home with his mom and dad. While collecting dirty laundry in his room one day, Jonas’ mother discovered some of Jonas’ clothing with dried blood on them. She also found a bloody survival knife and muddy boots under his bed, as well as a bracelet that said “Lynn.” A few days earlier, police had discovered the missing body of Jonas’ high school sweetheart, Lynn, in the woods. Lynn had recently broken up with him. The medical examiner had determined that Lynn had died from repeated stabbing. When Jonas had been questioned by the police at the station, he claimed he knew nothing of the incident, and the police have no evidence tying Jonas to the disappearance or murder. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of murder, or due process issues for example.) 2. District Attorney Schultz has brought charges against three players of the University football team. They have been charged with raping a stripper at a party attended by team members. The case has received much publicity and the media have discovered that the three players have a history of violence towards women. (Last year, two other women claimed they had been raped, but the cell phone video showing the forced sex had been excluded based on an illegal police search, and the players were found "not guilty.”) Shultz believes these players are guilty, and has given approximately 60 media interviews on the case. Schultz has also been campaigning for reelection, and a conviction here would go a long way. Unfortunately for Schultz, the DNA tests he ran do not match any of the three players to the victim’s assault. When he questioned her about this, the victim made contradictory statements, and she had no other evidence to corroborate the events. In fact, while her statements confirm that they raped her, she admitted to having consensual sex with two other men at the party, which weakens the case. Schultz decides to not tell anyone about the DNA results unless asked, and instructs the victim/witness to deny the other sexual encounters at trial. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of rape or due process issues for example.) Assuming that Schultz had a strong belief that the defendants were guilty, include in your analysis whether this affects the moral and legal permissibility of his conduct. 3. Michelle worked two jobs as a security guard in Phoenix, Arizona. She was walking outside the building where she works at 6:30 AM, Monday, when two bundles of money fell out of an armored truck en route to a bank. Inside the bundles was approximately $500,000. Michelle had an inheritance that would post to her bank account on Wednesday. She decides to take the day off and head to Las Vegas to play poker. Unfortunately, Michelle lost all of the money she gambled, but luckily, as expected, on Wednesday, her inheritance was paid. Michelle turned all of the $500,000 in to the FBI on Thursday morning, three days after finding it. Analyze these facts using ethical concepts or concerns from Module 8. (You are not evaluating elements of theft, conversion, or torts.) Include in your analysis whether Michelle was morally obligated to return the money. Should Michelle be penalized for using the money or for waiting three days to return the money? Click here to get this question answered.

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indesign self promotion

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


indesign self promotion Pin It There are two components to this final assignment. Part I-The Written Component: Should be completed first with a series of thumbnails indicated your finished format for this project. The first step is to write up something about your design and software skills and the knowledge you believe you’ve accomplished in Art 109 and other courses or internships you've completed. Write the piece in a way that would sell your accumulative design or creative skills not just to me but to a potential employer. You can list skills, previous experience, values, and data you have on your resume. Also include effective headlines, subheadings, blurbs, and bullet points throughout. Your copy can be informally written in terms of voice but should be edited for grammar and spelling. The final text should convince me you are a professional who pays attention to detail. A draft should be presented to me as a Word doc via email before laying out your InDesign document so I can proofread your copy and critique your approach. On the copy due date I also like to see sketches for your final design piece (described below). Part II-Design a Self-Promo: The second step is to adapt the text you've written as a professional self-promotional piece. You will create this in InDesign as a creative "visual resume" or portfolio promoting your design and/or technical skills--developing a layout that features effective graphic elements and images of the best artwork you’ve completed for this course (and others if you wish). The final product will be a well-designed showcase of your skills using appropriate headlines/captions/call-outs/quotes/etc. and your own images to make the piece inviting to a potential employer. When working with art consider changing colorcast, going black and white, or simplifying your artwork files to make it all work together cohesively. The final product must be an intended print piece (no billboards or web designs). This might include brochures, newsletter formats, posters, booklets, catalogs, 2-sided color resumes, an infographic or any other print work with sophisticated graphic elements for which a potential client or employer is your audience. The final layout should be created in InDesign but you may use any CS6 software to finesse the art and typography. These are the criteria on which you'll be evaluated: Approach/Copy/Communicates Professionalism Effective Document Set-up Format/Theme/Conveys a Creative Message Use of Color/Value/Line/Shape/Form Balance/Eye Path/Focal Interest/Neg.Space Use Concision/Visual Editing/ Use of a Grid Complexity/Tech. Skill/Follows Directions Effective Display Typography Effective Body Typography/Readibility Attention to Detail/Polish/Accuracy Your final email to me with the art should provide the document in pdf form (printers marks are not necessary)--and indicate in your message anything you think I need to know for understanding your intent. Use your imagination in this final project. A great deal of your grade depends on creativity as well as the sophistication and professionalism of the design.indesign self promotion Pin It There are two components to this final assignment. Part I-The Written Component: Should be completed first with a series of thumbnails indicated your finished format for this project. The first step is to write up something about your design and software skills and the knowledge you believe you’ve accomplished in Art 109 and other courses or internships you've completed. Write the piece in a way that would sell your accumulative design or creative skills not just to me but to a potential employer. You can list skills, previous experience, values, and data you have on your resume. Also include effective headlines, subheadings, blurbs, and bullet points throughout. Your copy can be informally written in terms of voice but should be edited for grammar and spelling. The final text should convince me you are a professional who pays attention to detail. A draft should be presented to me as a Word doc via email before laying out your InDesign document so I can proofread your copy and critique your approach. On the copy due date I also like to see sketches for your final design piece (described below). Part II-Design a Self-Promo: The second step is to adapt the text you've written as a professional self-promotional piece. You will create this in InDesign as a creative "visual resume" or portfolio promoting your design and/or technical skills--developing a layout that features effective graphic elements and images of the best artwork you’ve completed for this course (and others if you wish). The final product will be a well-designed showcase of your skills using appropriate headlines/captions/call-outs/quotes/etc. and your own images to make the piece inviting to a potential employer. When working with art consider changing colorcast, going black and white, or simplifying your artwork files to make it all work together cohesively. The final product must be an intended print piece (no billboards or web designs). This might include brochures, newsletter formats, posters, booklets, catalogs, 2-sided color resumes, an infographic or any other print work with sophisticated graphic elements for which a potential client or employer is your audience. The final layout should be created in InDesign but you may use any CS6 software to finesse the art and typography. These are the criteria on which you'll be evaluated: Approach/Copy/Communicates Professionalism Effective Document Set-up Format/Theme/Conveys a Creative Message Use of Color/Value/Line/Shape/Form Balance/Eye Path/Focal Interest/Neg.Space Use Concision/Visual Editing/ Use of a Grid Complexity/Tech. Skill/Follows Directions Effective Display Typography Effective Body Typography/Readibility Attention to Detail/Polish/Accuracy Your final email to me with the art should provide the document in pdf form (printers marks are not necessary)--and indicate in your message anything you think I need to know for understanding your intent. Use your imagination in this final project. A great deal of your grade depends on creativity as well as the sophistication and professionalism of the design.Click here to get this question answered.

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The New Product Development Process

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


The New Product Development Process In preparation for a presentation to the CEO of the organization next week on a product development strategy, prepare the following paper: Choose a product (not a service) which means it must be tangible. Prepare a paper addressing the following tasks on your selected product. Checklist: 1. Describe your new product. You have many choices. It could be a classically innovative product, new-category entry, an addition to the product line or line extension. It could even include more minor product changes like product improvements, repositioning, or cost reductions. 2. Discuss the new product development process. 3. Discuss your new product launch strategy. Recall, launching requires that objectives be set, the strategy be developed, and that the implementation be planned and executed. Implementation is often a key factor in product failure. 4. Discuss the pricing strategy for your new product 5. You will provide a 3–5 page (APA formatted) paper with at least three supporting references. You should include at least one illustration which can be included in the body of your paper or appendix. Submit your Assignment to the Unit 6 Dropbox. ID: MT450-06-07-AS The New Product Development Process In preparation for a presentation to the CEO of the organization next week on a product development strategy, prepare the following paper: Choose a product (not a service) which means it must be tangible. Prepare a paper addressing the following tasks on your selected product. Checklist: 1. Describe your new product. You have many choices. It could be a classically innovative product, new-category entry, an addition to the product line or line extension. It could even include more minor product changes like product improvements, repositioning, or cost reductions. 2. Discuss the new product development process. 3. Discuss your new product launch strategy. Recall, launching requires that objectives be set, the strategy be developed, and that the implementation be planned and executed. Implementation is often a key factor in product failure. 4. Discuss the pricing strategy for your new product 5. You will provide a 3–5 page (APA formatted) paper with at least three supporting references. You should include at least one illustration which can be included in the body of your paper or appendix. Submit your Assignment to the Unit 6 Dropbox. ID: MT450-06-07-AS Click here to get this question answered.

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Newsletter Tutorial

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Objective: In this assignment you will carefully enhance the newsletter you laid out for the Newsletter Tutorial and turn it into your own design. Using the finished tutorial as a template, consider how the pages hold style continuity within a particular grid system (as explained in class) and improve upon it. Use the tutorial newsletter as a template but use your own images and headlines to give it a fresh look and tweak the design to be more professional. The finished piece should serve as a full-size mock-up in InDesign for a 4-page newsletter with your own stamp on it. You are copying the layout but introducing your own subject matter, art, photos (which may be borrowed from the Internet), and display text choices to give it your own "signature." Examine your tutorial newsletter for its page-to-page, article-to-article continuity. Is it working? If not, fine tune your grid, column lines, and anchor points. (Find the imaginary rule lines (psychic wire) used by the creator to facilitate the design grid. Note the in consistencies. What would be helped by repeating elements? Make a visual guide as you study the publication, writing notes and column/gutter measurements directly in your sketchbook. You will be turning in your notes and/or sketches with your final InDesign document. While examining the newsletter for recurring fonts and other repeating stylistic choices, consider such details as page size, folio location, column widths, typographic and stylistic continuity, use of horizontal anchor-lines (weight lines), etc.--all things that make up a publication's unique "look." In summary, improve on the design and demonstrate your understanding (as explained in class) of good design. You will be evaluated on your attention to detail for things such as point size and style of body text and accurate measurements throughout (alley widths, common headline sizes, and consistent artistic styles--such as BW vs. color photo vs. illustration, etc.). You will also be evaluated on the elegance and readability of your type. Your layout needs to include effective typography with important elements like pull quotes, teasers, subheads, captions, and anything else that might appear on a “real” page of a magazine. Select any photos you wish to use at an appropriate resolution (240 to 300dpi for print). Search out interesting fonts to use as your display text. Use negative space efficiently and don’t clutter your layout. Pay attention to readability, focal points, eye path, and other effective magazine design rules AND GOOD VISUAL STORYTELLING. Your final layout should look like a published article E-newsletter or magazine spread. You may use place marker text for body copy in your mock-up but write your own headlines. Do not worry about printers marks or bleeds for this assignment. Export the finished article as PDF format but also keep the original InDesign file in your student folder. Be sure to "PACKAGE" your file, too. as explained in class. (For an explanation of packaging, refer to the Adobe reference manual | Look for "package" under the ID "File" menu commands. Packaging places your fonts and images into a folder you keep for your printer (or instructor). When exporting to PDF (for print) for this assignment you do not need to worry about printers’ marks (IN THE EXPORT DIALOGUE BOX that appears after "save." This final InDesign file is a finished mock-up (it does not have to be prepared for lithographic printing but should look as professional as any page in a magazine would and be ready for a creative director to understand and take it from here.) Click here to get this question answered.

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indesign self promotion

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


indesign self promotion Pin It There are two components to this final assignment. Part I-The Written Component: Should be completed first with a series of thumbnails indicated your finished format for this project. The first step is to write up something about your design and software skills and the knowledge you believe you’ve accomplished in Art 109 and other courses or internships you've completed. Write the piece in a way that would sell your accumulative design or creative skills not just to me but to a potential employer. You can list skills, previous experience, values, and data you have on your resume. Also include effective headlines, subheadings, blurbs, and bullet points throughout. Your copy can be informally written in terms of voice but should be edited for grammar and spelling. The final text should convince me you are a professional who pays attention to detail. A draft should be presented to me as a Word doc via email before laying out your InDesign document so I can proofread your copy and critique your approach. On the copy due date I also like to see sketches for your final design piece (described below). Part II-Design a Self-Promo: The second step is to adapt the text you've written as a professional self-promotional piece. You will create this in InDesign as a creative "visual resume" or portfolio promoting your design and/or technical skills--developing a layout that features effective graphic elements and images of the best artwork you’ve completed for this course (and others if you wish). The final product will be a well-designed showcase of your skills using appropriate headlines/captions/call-outs/quotes/etc. and your own images to make the piece inviting to a potential employer. When working with art consider changing colorcast, going black and white, or simplifying your artwork files to make it all work together cohesively. The final product must be an intended print piece (no billboards or web designs). This might include brochures, newsletter formats, posters, booklets, catalogs, 2-sided color resumes, an infographic or any other print work with sophisticated graphic elements for which a potential client or employer is your audience. The final layout should be created in InDesign but you may use any CS6 software to finesse the art and typography. These are the criteria on which you'll be evaluated: Approach/Copy/Communicates Professionalism Effective Document Set-up Format/Theme/Conveys a Creative Message Use of Color/Value/Line/Shape/Form Balance/Eye Path/Focal Interest/Neg.Space Use Concision/Visual Editing/ Use of a Grid Complexity/Tech. Skill/Follows Directions Effective Display Typography Effective Body Typography/Readibility Attention to Detail/Polish/Accuracy Your final email to me with the art should provide the document in pdf form (printers marks are not necessary)--and indicate in your message anything you think I need to know for understanding your intent. Use your imagination in this final project. A great deal of your grade depends on creativity as well as the sophistication and professionalism of the design.indesign self promotion Pin It There are two components to this final assignment. Part I-The Written Component: Should be completed first with a series of thumbnails indicated your finished format for this project. The first step is to write up something about your design and software skills and the knowledge you believe you’ve accomplished in Art 109 and other courses or internships you've completed. Write the piece in a way that would sell your accumulative design or creative skills not just to me but to a potential employer. You can list skills, previous experience, values, and data you have on your resume. Also include effective headlines, subheadings, blurbs, and bullet points throughout. Your copy can be informally written in terms of voice but should be edited for grammar and spelling. The final text should convince me you are a professional who pays attention to detail. A draft should be presented to me as a Word doc via email before laying out your InDesign document so I can proofread your copy and critique your approach. On the copy due date I also like to see sketches for your final design piece (described below). Part II-Design a Self-Promo: The second step is to adapt the text you've written as a professional self-promotional piece. You will create this in InDesign as a creative "visual resume" or portfolio promoting your design and/or technical skills--developing a layout that features effective graphic elements and images of the best artwork you’ve completed for this course (and others if you wish). The final product will be a well-designed showcase of your skills using appropriate headlines/captions/call-outs/quotes/etc. and your own images to make the piece inviting to a potential employer. When working with art consider changing colorcast, going black and white, or simplifying your artwork files to make it all work together cohesively. The final product must be an intended print piece (no billboards or web designs). This might include brochures, newsletter formats, posters, booklets, catalogs, 2-sided color resumes, an infographic or any other print work with sophisticated graphic elements for which a potential client or employer is your audience. The final layout should be created in InDesign but you may use any CS6 software to finesse the art and typography. These are the criteria on which you'll be evaluated: Approach/Copy/Communicates Professionalism Effective Document Set-up Format/Theme/Conveys a Creative Message Use of Color/Value/Line/Shape/Form Balance/Eye Path/Focal Interest/Neg.Space Use Concision/Visual Editing/ Use of a Grid Complexity/Tech. Skill/Follows Directions Effective Display Typography Effective Body Typography/Readibility Attention to Detail/Polish/Accuracy Your final email to me with the art should provide the document in pdf form (printers marks are not necessary)--and indicate in your message anything you think I need to know for understanding your intent. Use your imagination in this final project. A great deal of your grade depends on creativity as well as the sophistication and professionalism of the design.Click here to get this question answered.

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Newsletter Tutorial

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Objective: In this assignment you will carefully enhance the newsletter you laid out for the Newsletter Tutorial and turn it into your own design. Using the finished tutorial as a template, consider how the pages hold style continuity within a particular grid system (as explained in class) and improve upon it. Use the tutorial newsletter as a template but use your own images and headlines to give it a fresh look and tweak the design to be more professional. The finished piece should serve as a full-size mock-up in InDesign for a 4-page newsletter with your own stamp on it. You are copying the layout but introducing your own subject matter, art, photos (which may be borrowed from the Internet), and display text choices to give it your own "signature." Examine your tutorial newsletter for its page-to-page, article-to-article continuity. Is it working? If not, fine tune your grid, column lines, and anchor points. (Find the imaginary rule lines (psychic wire) used by the creator to facilitate the design grid. Note the in consistencies. What would be helped by repeating elements? Make a visual guide as you study the publication, writing notes and column/gutter measurements directly in your sketchbook. You will be turning in your notes and/or sketches with your final InDesign document. While examining the newsletter for recurring fonts and other repeating stylistic choices, consider such details as page size, folio location, column widths, typographic and stylistic continuity, use of horizontal anchor-lines (weight lines), etc.--all things that make up a publication's unique "look." In summary, improve on the design and demonstrate your understanding (as explained in class) of good design. You will be evaluated on your attention to detail for things such as point size and style of body text and accurate measurements throughout (alley widths, common headline sizes, and consistent artistic styles--such as BW vs. color photo vs. illustration, etc.). You will also be evaluated on the elegance and readability of your type. Your layout needs to include effective typography with important elements like pull quotes, teasers, subheads, captions, and anything else that might appear on a “real” page of a magazine. Select any photos you wish to use at an appropriate resolution (240 to 300dpi for print). Search out interesting fonts to use as your display text. Use negative space efficiently and don’t clutter your layout. Pay attention to readability, focal points, eye path, and other effective magazine design rules AND GOOD VISUAL STORYTELLING. Your final layout should look like a published article E-newsletter or magazine spread. You may use place marker text for body copy in your mock-up but write your own headlines. Do not worry about printers marks or bleeds for this assignment. Export the finished article as PDF format but also keep the original InDesign file in your student folder. Be sure to "PACKAGE" your file, too. as explained in class. (For an explanation of packaging, refer to the Adobe reference manual | Look for "package" under the ID "File" menu commands. Packaging places your fonts and images into a folder you keep for your printer (or instructor). When exporting to PDF (for print) for this assignment you do not need to worry about printers’ marks (IN THE EXPORT DIALOGUE BOX that appears after "save." This final InDesign file is a finished mock-up (it does not have to be prepared for lithographic printing but should look as professional as any page in a magazine would and be ready for a creative director to understand and take it from here.) Click here to get this question answered.

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Brand Over Pricing

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Brand Over Pricing This discussion focuses on the importance of branding. As Winer (2012) suggests, if you are dissatisfied with the present position, the brand needs to be repositioned and the value proposition may need to be changed. Topic 1: Over the years, many famous brands have been repositioned. Some include KFC, Friendly’s, Radio Shack and JC Penny. Using the online library or other scholarly resources, give several examples of brands that have been recently repositioned. How has this been implemented and for what reason? Topic 2: Being up to date with current events is an important part of becoming a business professional. In marketing, it is part of an important responsibility to continuously scan the external environment for opportunities and threats. Visit the Kaplan library and select a current article (no more than one or two years old) on pricing strategies for a small to medium size business. You can access the KU Library in the home area of the course. Be ready to critique the article and discuss what other small to medium size businesses can learn from these strategies identified. Brand Over Pricing This discussion focuses on the importance of branding. As Winer (2012) suggests, if you are dissatisfied with the present position, the brand needs to be repositioned and the value proposition may need to be changed. Topic 1: Over the years, many famous brands have been repositioned. Some include KFC, Friendly’s, Radio Shack and JC Penny. Using the online library or other scholarly resources, give several examples of brands that have been recently repositioned. How has this been implemented and for what reason? Topic 2: Being up to date with current events is an important part of becoming a business professional. In marketing, it is part of an important responsibility to continuously scan the external environment for opportunities and threats. Visit the Kaplan library and select a current article (no more than one or two years old) on pricing strategies for a small to medium size business. You can access the KU Library in the home area of the course. Be ready to critique the article and discuss what other small to medium size businesses can learn from these strategies identified. Click here to get this question answered.

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Brand Over Pricing

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Brand Over Pricing This discussion focuses on the importance of branding. As Winer (2012) suggests, if you are dissatisfied with the present position, the brand needs to be repositioned and the value proposition may need to be changed. Topic 1: Over the years, many famous brands have been repositioned. Some include KFC, Friendly’s, Radio Shack and JC Penny. Using the online library or other scholarly resources, give several examples of brands that have been recently repositioned. How has this been implemented and for what reason? Topic 2: Being up to date with current events is an important part of becoming a business professional. In marketing, it is part of an important responsibility to continuously scan the external environment for opportunities and threats. Visit the Kaplan library and select a current article (no more than one or two years old) on pricing strategies for a small to medium size business. You can access the KU Library in the home area of the course. Be ready to critique the article and discuss what other small to medium size businesses can learn from these strategies identified. Brand Over Pricing This discussion focuses on the importance of branding. As Winer (2012) suggests, if you are dissatisfied with the present position, the brand needs to be repositioned and the value proposition may need to be changed. Topic 1: Over the years, many famous brands have been repositioned. Some include KFC, Friendly’s, Radio Shack and JC Penny. Using the online library or other scholarly resources, give several examples of brands that have been recently repositioned. How has this been implemented and for what reason? Topic 2: Being up to date with current events is an important part of becoming a business professional. In marketing, it is part of an important responsibility to continuously scan the external environment for opportunities and threats. Visit the Kaplan library and select a current article (no more than one or two years old) on pricing strategies for a small to medium size business. You can access the KU Library in the home area of the course. Be ready to critique the article and discuss what other small to medium size businesses can learn from these strategies identified. Click here to get this question answered.

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FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Suffolk University Finance 200 FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT This assignment is aimed at familiarizing you with some sources of published financial data. It is worth 50 points. This assignment should be neatly typed. It is due on the last class day (not the final). Four points per day (M-F) will be deducted for late papers. First, you need to pick a public company to analyze. You should have already informed me of the company you have picked. A brief description of the components of the assignment follows: 1. COMPANY BACKGROUND (15 points) – This will include background information on your company, its industry, and competitors. 2. COMPANY STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS (20 points) – This will include daily tracking and analysis of the company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 index from March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday). This is fifteen days of price changes and activities. Markets are not open on weekends or holidays. 3. A RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS (15 Points) – This will include estimating the return on an investment in the stock of the company and a comparison of the risk of the company to that of some other companies in the same and other industries. Notes on the Sawyer Library: A major purpose of this assignment is to acquaint you with the incredible amount of information that is readily accessible in business libraries and on the internet. Sawyer Library is a very good library and the librarians at the reference section are very knowledgeable and helpful. Spend some time looking around, both online and on the shelf in the Business Reference sections. #1. COMPANY BACKGROUND You should, at a minimum: • Describe the company and its main product or service lines, the general location of its facilities, and the geography of its markets. Recent history, including mergers, acquisitions, troubles, successes, and other points of interest should also be mentioned. • Provide some basic financial data to describe the company. How big is it? Is it successful? Is it growing? • Describe the company’s main industry. • Identify major competitors and briefly compare these competitors to your company. Include financial indicators. • Discuss recent economic conditions in the industry, as well as prospects for the future. In short, this section should provide the background necessary to make subsequent sections interesting and understandable. TRY TO KEEP THIS TO 2-3 PAGES. Starting points for background on the company and industry include Yahoo Finance and Google Finance. The company web page is a very good source of financial data, but descriptive info provided by the company is biased. #2. STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS In this section, you will develop time series of DAILY closing prices of your company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 stock market index. NOTE THAT THE CLOSING PRICE ON A DAY IS FOUND IN THE NEXT DAY’S PAPER. FRIDAY PRICES ARE FOUND IN THE MONDAY WALL STREET JOURNAL OR THE SATURDAY LOCAL PAPER. A very valuable source for finance students is http://finance.yahoo.com/. The markets close everyday at 4:00 pm Eastern time. I suggest that everyday between March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday), go to the Yahoo website after 4:00 p.m. Search for your company using the ticker symbol and check out the page. Also, check out the page for S&P 500 index (ticker symbol ^GSPC). If your stock price AND/OR the S&P 500 market index moves up or down significantly during the period, you should try to determine what caused the change and discuss it in your paper. Writing down the volume of trading on the stock each day may be helpful. A dramatic rise in volume will give you an indication that something is up, indicating the existence of some news relevant to the future of your company. Note that volume changes reflect an interest in a stock, but are not a cause of a rise or fall in the price. Prepare a table of the closing prices of the index and your company’s stock price. Compute the rate of return on both the index and your stock over the three weeks. #3. RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS Here you will use the daily data to assess the risk and return of your company and others. As noted earlier, you should find information on your company, its industry, and its competitors in Yahoo Finance. You can find information on stock betas in http://nasdaq.com/. Look in Summary Quotes. The assignment is to estimate returns on your company and its competitors. The risk free rate is approximated by the 30 year U.S. Treasury Bill rate and can be obtained from almost any daily newspaper. You will need to calculate the expected return using the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). You can find the average long-term risk premium from the article by Jeremy J. Siegel posted in the Blackboard. If ?s differ across companies in the industry, you should think about why that might be and discuss it in your paper. In addition, you should think about whether the ?s are consistent with the knowledge you now have about your company and discuss that as well. Notes: To do well in this assignment, I suggest that you do the following: – Track daily macro-economic and industry specific news that may influence the price of stocks – Draw graphs and produce interesting charts – I expect more detail on the second (Stock Price Analysis) and third (Risk and Return Analysis) parts of the assignments – Present intelligent discussions – Do not hesitate to offer your suggestion on the stocks (e.g. whether the stock has good growth potential, whether it is fairly valued, etc.) Suffolk University Finance 200 FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT This assignment is aimed at familiarizing you with some sources of published financial data. It is worth 50 points. This assignment should be neatly typed. It is due on the last class day (not the final). Four points per day (M-F) will be deducted for late papers. First, you need to pick a public company to analyze. You should have already informed me of the company you have picked. A brief description of the components of the assignment follows: 1. COMPANY BACKGROUND (15 points) – This will include background information on your company, its industry, and competitors. 2. COMPANY STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS (20 points) – This will include daily tracking and analysis of the company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 index from March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday). This is fifteen days of price changes and activities. Markets are not open on weekends or holidays. 3. A RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS (15 Points) – This will include estimating the return on an investment in the stock of the company and a comparison of the risk of the company to that of some other companies in the same and other industries. Notes on the Sawyer Library: A major purpose of this assignment is to acquaint you with the incredible amount of information that is readily accessible in business libraries and on the internet. Sawyer Library is a very good library and the librarians at the reference section are very knowledgeable and helpful. Spend some time looking around, both online and on the shelf in the Business Reference sections. #1. COMPANY BACKGROUND You should, at a minimum: • Describe the company and its main product or service lines, the general location of its facilities, and the geography of its markets. Recent history, including mergers, acquisitions, troubles, successes, and other points of interest should also be mentioned. • Provide some basic financial data to describe the company. How big is it? Is it successful? Is it growing? • Describe the company’s main industry. • Identify major competitors and briefly compare these competitors to your company. Include financial indicators. • Discuss recent economic conditions in the industry, as well as prospects for the future. In short, this section should provide the background necessary to make subsequent sections interesting and understandable. TRY TO KEEP THIS TO 2-3 PAGES. Starting points for background on the company and industry include Yahoo Finance and Google Finance. The company web page is a very good source of financial data, but descriptive info provided by the company is biased. #2. STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS In this section, you will develop time series of DAILY closing prices of your company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 stock market index. NOTE THAT THE CLOSING PRICE ON A DAY IS FOUND IN THE NEXT DAY’S PAPER. FRIDAY PRICES ARE FOUND IN THE MONDAY WALL STREET JOURNAL OR THE SATURDAY LOCAL PAPER. A very valuable source for finance students is http://finance.yahoo.com/. The markets close everyday at 4:00 pm Eastern time. I suggest that everyday between March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday), go to the Yahoo website after 4:00 p.m. Search for your company using the ticker symbol and check out the page. Also, check out the page for S&P 500 index (ticker symbol ^GSPC). If your stock price AND/OR the S&P 500 market index moves up or down significantly during the period, you should try to determine what caused the change and discuss it in your paper. Writing down the volume of trading on the stock each day may be helpful. A dramatic rise in volume will give you an indication that something is up, indicating the existence of some news relevant to the future of your company. Note that volume changes reflect an interest in a stock, but are not a cause of a rise or fall in the price. Prepare a table of the closing prices of the index and your company’s stock price. Compute the rate of return on both the index and your stock over the three weeks. #3. RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS Here you will use the daily data to assess the risk and return of your company and others. As noted earlier, you should find information on your company, its industry, and its competitors in Yahoo Finance. You can find information on stock betas in http://nasdaq.com/. Look in Summary Quotes. The assignment is to estimate returns on your company and its competitors. The risk free rate is approximated by the 30 year U.S. Treasury Bill rate and can be obtained from almost any daily newspaper. You will need to calculate the expected return using the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). You can find the average long-term risk premium from the article by Jeremy J. Siegel posted in the Blackboard. If ?s differ across companies in the industry, you should think about why that might be and discuss it in your paper. In addition, you should think about whether the ?s are consistent with the knowledge you now have about your company and discuss that as well. Notes: To do well in this assignment, I suggest that you do the following: – Track daily macro-economic and industry specific news that may influence the price of stocks – Draw graphs and produce interesting charts – I expect more detail on the second (Stock Price Analysis) and third (Risk and Return Analysis) parts of the assignments – Present intelligent discussions – Do not hesitate to offer your suggestion on the stocks (e.g. whether the stock has good growth potential, whether it is fairly valued, etc.) Click here to get this question answered.

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Write a three- to four-page paper

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. Click here to get this question answered.

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FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Suffolk University Finance 200 FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT This assignment is aimed at familiarizing you with some sources of published financial data. It is worth 50 points. This assignment should be neatly typed. It is due on the last class day (not the final). Four points per day (M-F) will be deducted for late papers. First, you need to pick a public company to analyze. You should have already informed me of the company you have picked. A brief description of the components of the assignment follows: 1. COMPANY BACKGROUND (15 points) – This will include background information on your company, its industry, and competitors. 2. COMPANY STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS (20 points) – This will include daily tracking and analysis of the company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 index from March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday). This is fifteen days of price changes and activities. Markets are not open on weekends or holidays. 3. A RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS (15 Points) – This will include estimating the return on an investment in the stock of the company and a comparison of the risk of the company to that of some other companies in the same and other industries. Notes on the Sawyer Library: A major purpose of this assignment is to acquaint you with the incredible amount of information that is readily accessible in business libraries and on the internet. Sawyer Library is a very good library and the librarians at the reference section are very knowledgeable and helpful. Spend some time looking around, both online and on the shelf in the Business Reference sections. #1. COMPANY BACKGROUND You should, at a minimum: • Describe the company and its main product or service lines, the general location of its facilities, and the geography of its markets. Recent history, including mergers, acquisitions, troubles, successes, and other points of interest should also be mentioned. • Provide some basic financial data to describe the company. How big is it? Is it successful? Is it growing? • Describe the company’s main industry. • Identify major competitors and briefly compare these competitors to your company. Include financial indicators. • Discuss recent economic conditions in the industry, as well as prospects for the future. In short, this section should provide the background necessary to make subsequent sections interesting and understandable. TRY TO KEEP THIS TO 2-3 PAGES. Starting points for background on the company and industry include Yahoo Finance and Google Finance. The company web page is a very good source of financial data, but descriptive info provided by the company is biased. #2. STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS In this section, you will develop time series of DAILY closing prices of your company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 stock market index. NOTE THAT THE CLOSING PRICE ON A DAY IS FOUND IN THE NEXT DAY’S PAPER. FRIDAY PRICES ARE FOUND IN THE MONDAY WALL STREET JOURNAL OR THE SATURDAY LOCAL PAPER. A very valuable source for finance students is http://finance.yahoo.com/. The markets close everyday at 4:00 pm Eastern time. I suggest that everyday between March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday), go to the Yahoo website after 4:00 p.m. Search for your company using the ticker symbol and check out the page. Also, check out the page for S&P 500 index (ticker symbol ^GSPC). If your stock price AND/OR the S&P 500 market index moves up or down significantly during the period, you should try to determine what caused the change and discuss it in your paper. Writing down the volume of trading on the stock each day may be helpful. A dramatic rise in volume will give you an indication that something is up, indicating the existence of some news relevant to the future of your company. Note that volume changes reflect an interest in a stock, but are not a cause of a rise or fall in the price. Prepare a table of the closing prices of the index and your company’s stock price. Compute the rate of return on both the index and your stock over the three weeks. #3. RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS Here you will use the daily data to assess the risk and return of your company and others. As noted earlier, you should find information on your company, its industry, and its competitors in Yahoo Finance. You can find information on stock betas in http://nasdaq.com/. Look in Summary Quotes. The assignment is to estimate returns on your company and its competitors. The risk free rate is approximated by the 30 year U.S. Treasury Bill rate and can be obtained from almost any daily newspaper. You will need to calculate the expected return using the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). You can find the average long-term risk premium from the article by Jeremy J. Siegel posted in the Blackboard. If ?s differ across companies in the industry, you should think about why that might be and discuss it in your paper. In addition, you should think about whether the ?s are consistent with the knowledge you now have about your company and discuss that as well. Notes: To do well in this assignment, I suggest that you do the following: – Track daily macro-economic and industry specific news that may influence the price of stocks – Draw graphs and produce interesting charts – I expect more detail on the second (Stock Price Analysis) and third (Risk and Return Analysis) parts of the assignments – Present intelligent discussions – Do not hesitate to offer your suggestion on the stocks (e.g. whether the stock has good growth potential, whether it is fairly valued, etc.) Suffolk University Finance 200 FINANCIAL DATA ANALYSIS ASSIGNMENT This assignment is aimed at familiarizing you with some sources of published financial data. It is worth 50 points. This assignment should be neatly typed. It is due on the last class day (not the final). Four points per day (M-F) will be deducted for late papers. First, you need to pick a public company to analyze. You should have already informed me of the company you have picked. A brief description of the components of the assignment follows: 1. COMPANY BACKGROUND (15 points) – This will include background information on your company, its industry, and competitors. 2. COMPANY STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS (20 points) – This will include daily tracking and analysis of the company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 index from March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday). This is fifteen days of price changes and activities. Markets are not open on weekends or holidays. 3. A RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS (15 Points) – This will include estimating the return on an investment in the stock of the company and a comparison of the risk of the company to that of some other companies in the same and other industries. Notes on the Sawyer Library: A major purpose of this assignment is to acquaint you with the incredible amount of information that is readily accessible in business libraries and on the internet. Sawyer Library is a very good library and the librarians at the reference section are very knowledgeable and helpful. Spend some time looking around, both online and on the shelf in the Business Reference sections. #1. COMPANY BACKGROUND You should, at a minimum: • Describe the company and its main product or service lines, the general location of its facilities, and the geography of its markets. Recent history, including mergers, acquisitions, troubles, successes, and other points of interest should also be mentioned. • Provide some basic financial data to describe the company. How big is it? Is it successful? Is it growing? • Describe the company’s main industry. • Identify major competitors and briefly compare these competitors to your company. Include financial indicators. • Discuss recent economic conditions in the industry, as well as prospects for the future. In short, this section should provide the background necessary to make subsequent sections interesting and understandable. TRY TO KEEP THIS TO 2-3 PAGES. Starting points for background on the company and industry include Yahoo Finance and Google Finance. The company web page is a very good source of financial data, but descriptive info provided by the company is biased. #2. STOCK PRICE ANALYSIS In this section, you will develop time series of DAILY closing prices of your company’s common stock price AND the S&P 500 stock market index. NOTE THAT THE CLOSING PRICE ON A DAY IS FOUND IN THE NEXT DAY’S PAPER. FRIDAY PRICES ARE FOUND IN THE MONDAY WALL STREET JOURNAL OR THE SATURDAY LOCAL PAPER. A very valuable source for finance students is http://finance.yahoo.com/. The markets close everyday at 4:00 pm Eastern time. I suggest that everyday between March 23rd (Monday) through April 10th (Friday), go to the Yahoo website after 4:00 p.m. Search for your company using the ticker symbol and check out the page. Also, check out the page for S&P 500 index (ticker symbol ^GSPC). If your stock price AND/OR the S&P 500 market index moves up or down significantly during the period, you should try to determine what caused the change and discuss it in your paper. Writing down the volume of trading on the stock each day may be helpful. A dramatic rise in volume will give you an indication that something is up, indicating the existence of some news relevant to the future of your company. Note that volume changes reflect an interest in a stock, but are not a cause of a rise or fall in the price. Prepare a table of the closing prices of the index and your company’s stock price. Compute the rate of return on both the index and your stock over the three weeks. #3. RISK AND RETURN ANALYSIS Here you will use the daily data to assess the risk and return of your company and others. As noted earlier, you should find information on your company, its industry, and its competitors in Yahoo Finance. You can find information on stock betas in http://nasdaq.com/. Look in Summary Quotes. The assignment is to estimate returns on your company and its competitors. The risk free rate is approximated by the 30 year U.S. Treasury Bill rate and can be obtained from almost any daily newspaper. You will need to calculate the expected return using the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). You can find the average long-term risk premium from the article by Jeremy J. Siegel posted in the Blackboard. If ?s differ across companies in the industry, you should think about why that might be and discuss it in your paper. In addition, you should think about whether the ?s are consistent with the knowledge you now have about your company and discuss that as well. Notes: To do well in this assignment, I suggest that you do the following: – Track daily macro-economic and industry specific news that may influence the price of stocks – Draw graphs and produce interesting charts – I expect more detail on the second (Stock Price Analysis) and third (Risk and Return Analysis) parts of the assignments – Present intelligent discussions – Do not hesitate to offer your suggestion on the stocks (e.g. whether the stock has good growth potential, whether it is fairly valued, etc.) Click here to get this question answered.

Read More

Write a three- to four-page paper

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. BUS 370 Week 3 Assignment Pin It Write a three- to four-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) describing the concept of a Force Field Analysis (FFA) and then creating an FFA on an issue in your life that you would like to change. Describe how the restraining forces impede your progress and develop an intervention strategy to enhance the driving forces to make change possible. Click here to get this question answered.

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a home yard project.

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Assignment: This exercise consists of a list of tasks for a home yard project. Working in Microsoft Project, you will create the task list, including summary tasks and their sub-tasks, create links between tasks and their predecessors. Set a start date for your project of May 1st, 2015. Enter the following tasks, including the duration, where specified. Tasks with unspecified duration are summary tasks and the rest are sub-tasks. When completed save the file and submit the file via Canvas. ID: Task List: Duration: Predecessors: 1 Preparation 2 Get trash bags 5 min 3 Pick up trash 20 min 2 4 Put gas in the equipment 5 min 5 Get the hedge clippers 5 min 6 Do the work 7 Trim weeds 30 min 3,4 8 Mow front yard 60 min 3,4 9 Edge sidewalk 20 min 3,4 10 Trim Hedge 30 min 5 11 Mow back yard 45 min 8 12 Clean up 13 Bag grass 35 min 7,9,10,11 14 Bundle trash 20 min 7,9,10,11 15 Haul trash 45 min 13,14 Saving/Naming Your File: When you save your file make sure that your name and the project number are included in it. Assignment: This exercise consists of a list of tasks for a home yard project. Working in Microsoft Project, you will create the task list, including summary tasks and their sub-tasks, create links between tasks and their predecessors. Set a start date for your project of May 1st, 2015. Enter the following tasks, including the duration, where specified. Tasks with unspecified duration are summary tasks and the rest are sub-tasks. When completed save the file and submit the file via Canvas. ID: Task List: Duration: Predecessors: 1 Preparation 2 Get trash bags 5 min 3 Pick up trash 20 min 2 4 Put gas in the equipment 5 min 5 Get the hedge clippers 5 min 6 Do the work 7 Trim weeds 30 min 3,4 8 Mow front yard 60 min 3,4 9 Edge sidewalk 20 min 3,4 10 Trim Hedge 30 min 5 11 Mow back yard 45 min 8 12 Clean up 13 Bag grass 35 min 7,9,10,11 14 Bundle trash 20 min 7,9,10,11 15 Haul trash 45 min 13,14 Saving/Naming Your File: When you save your file make sure that your name and the project number are included in it. Click here to get this question answered.

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Excel Spreadsheet

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Excel Spreadsheet Pin It Research the publicly held company that you chose in Week 1, Las Vegas Sands and access the company's Web page on the Internet to read its most recent annual report. The annual report is typically found in an "Investor Relations" or "Company Information" section within the company's Web site. Using the company's financial statements, perform a complete 2- or 3-year financial statement analysis addressing profitability ratios, turnover control ratios, leverage and liquidity ratio, and common-size statement analysis with constructive narrative. This analysis should not only include the calculation of the required ratios, but an assessment of the firm’s health in each area and a summary of the findings with regards to the overall health of the firm. All related findings, conclusions, and recommendations should be supported with sound financial analysis principles and be properly sourced. Please see the text (Table 2.5) for suggested ratios and measures to preform and evaluate. You may also use the categories and measures that follow: Liquidity Measures: Current ratio [current assets/current liabilities] Quick ratio-acid test [(current assets – inventory)/current liabilities] Net working capital to total assets [net working capital/total assets] Efficiency Measures: Collection period [accounts receivable/average daily sales] Inventory turnover [cost of goods sold/ending inventory] Fixed asset turnover [sales/net fixed assets] Debt (Leverage) Measures: Debt-to-asset ratio [total liabilities/total assets] Debt-to-equity ratio [total liabilities/total stockholder equity] Times-interest-earned (TIE) ratio [earnings before interest and tax [EBIT]/interest] Profitability Measures: Gross profit margin [gross profit/sales] Operating profit margin [EBIT/sales] Net profit margin [net income/sales] Return on assets (ROA) [net income/total assets] Return on equity (ROE) [net income/total stockholder equity] Market-Based Measures: Earnings per share (EPS) [earnings available to common stockholders/common shares outstanding] Price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) [stock price/earnings per share] Market to book [market value of common stock/total stockholder equity] Click here to get this question answered.

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a home yard project.

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Assignment: This exercise consists of a list of tasks for a home yard project. Working in Microsoft Project, you will create the task list, including summary tasks and their sub-tasks, create links between tasks and their predecessors. Set a start date for your project of May 1st, 2015. Enter the following tasks, including the duration, where specified. Tasks with unspecified duration are summary tasks and the rest are sub-tasks. When completed save the file and submit the file via Canvas. ID: Task List: Duration: Predecessors: 1 Preparation 2 Get trash bags 5 min 3 Pick up trash 20 min 2 4 Put gas in the equipment 5 min 5 Get the hedge clippers 5 min 6 Do the work 7 Trim weeds 30 min 3,4 8 Mow front yard 60 min 3,4 9 Edge sidewalk 20 min 3,4 10 Trim Hedge 30 min 5 11 Mow back yard 45 min 8 12 Clean up 13 Bag grass 35 min 7,9,10,11 14 Bundle trash 20 min 7,9,10,11 15 Haul trash 45 min 13,14 Saving/Naming Your File: When you save your file make sure that your name and the project number are included in it. Assignment: This exercise consists of a list of tasks for a home yard project. Working in Microsoft Project, you will create the task list, including summary tasks and their sub-tasks, create links between tasks and their predecessors. Set a start date for your project of May 1st, 2015. Enter the following tasks, including the duration, where specified. Tasks with unspecified duration are summary tasks and the rest are sub-tasks. When completed save the file and submit the file via Canvas. ID: Task List: Duration: Predecessors: 1 Preparation 2 Get trash bags 5 min 3 Pick up trash 20 min 2 4 Put gas in the equipment 5 min 5 Get the hedge clippers 5 min 6 Do the work 7 Trim weeds 30 min 3,4 8 Mow front yard 60 min 3,4 9 Edge sidewalk 20 min 3,4 10 Trim Hedge 30 min 5 11 Mow back yard 45 min 8 12 Clean up 13 Bag grass 35 min 7,9,10,11 14 Bundle trash 20 min 7,9,10,11 15 Haul trash 45 min 13,14 Saving/Naming Your File: When you save your file make sure that your name and the project number are included in it. Click here to get this question answered.

Read More

Excel Spreadsheet

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Excel Spreadsheet Pin It Research the publicly held company that you chose in Week 1, Las Vegas Sands and access the company's Web page on the Internet to read its most recent annual report. The annual report is typically found in an "Investor Relations" or "Company Information" section within the company's Web site. Using the company's financial statements, perform a complete 2- or 3-year financial statement analysis addressing profitability ratios, turnover control ratios, leverage and liquidity ratio, and common-size statement analysis with constructive narrative. This analysis should not only include the calculation of the required ratios, but an assessment of the firm’s health in each area and a summary of the findings with regards to the overall health of the firm. All related findings, conclusions, and recommendations should be supported with sound financial analysis principles and be properly sourced. Please see the text (Table 2.5) for suggested ratios and measures to preform and evaluate. You may also use the categories and measures that follow: Liquidity Measures: Current ratio [current assets/current liabilities] Quick ratio-acid test [(current assets – inventory)/current liabilities] Net working capital to total assets [net working capital/total assets] Efficiency Measures: Collection period [accounts receivable/average daily sales] Inventory turnover [cost of goods sold/ending inventory] Fixed asset turnover [sales/net fixed assets] Debt (Leverage) Measures: Debt-to-asset ratio [total liabilities/total assets] Debt-to-equity ratio [total liabilities/total stockholder equity] Times-interest-earned (TIE) ratio [earnings before interest and tax [EBIT]/interest] Profitability Measures: Gross profit margin [gross profit/sales] Operating profit margin [EBIT/sales] Net profit margin [net income/sales] Return on assets (ROA) [net income/total assets] Return on equity (ROE) [net income/total stockholder equity] Market-Based Measures: Earnings per share (EPS) [earnings available to common stockholders/common shares outstanding] Price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) [stock price/earnings per share] Market to book [market value of common stock/total stockholder equity] Click here to get this question answered.

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Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.”

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” Pin It Remember in this course, you will develop one essay. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” In your essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the three reasons behind your decision. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” You have taken a marvelous, brave step on an educational journey. Congratulations! You have likely done a great deal of soul-searching to come to this enormous decision. The purpose of this essay, therefore, is for you to tell your readers (your instructor and your classmates) why you came to this decision. In your “Changing Our Lives” essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the reasons behind your decision. In this assignment, you will take the next step of the essay writing process by creating an outline to help you organize your ideas for your essay. Download the "Outline Template" by clicking this link. Please review the “Sample Student Outline” by clicking this link to download. "Sample Student Outline" can also be accessed by using the "Additional Resources" link in each week or by navigating to Student Center>Additional Resources. (Please do NOT write your whole essay in this assignment. We will create the essay step-by-step each week for final submission in Week 10. Creating your outline is the next step in creating your essay.) Create a topic outline in which you: Use the outline template located in the course shell to create a topic outline. Use short phrases and NOT complete sentences. Identify at least three (3) main points. Identify at least two (2) supporting points for each main point. Minimize mechanical and stylistic errors.Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” Pin It Remember in this course, you will develop one essay. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” In your essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the three reasons behind your decision. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” You have taken a marvelous, brave step on an educational journey. Congratulations! You have likely done a great deal of soul-searching to come to this enormous decision. The purpose of this essay, therefore, is for you to tell your readers (your instructor and your classmates) why you came to this decision. In your “Changing Our Lives” essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the reasons behind your decision. In this assignment, you will take the next step of the essay writing process by creating an outline to help you organize your ideas for your essay. Download the "Outline Template" by clicking this link. Please review the “Sample Student Outline” by clicking this link to download. "Sample Student Outline" can also be accessed by using the "Additional Resources" link in each week or by navigating to Student Center>Additional Resources. (Please do NOT write your whole essay in this assignment. We will create the essay step-by-step each week for final submission in Week 10. Creating your outline is the next step in creating your essay.) Create a topic outline in which you: Use the outline template located in the course shell to create a topic outline. Use short phrases and NOT complete sentences. Identify at least three (3) main points. Identify at least two (2) supporting points for each main point. Minimize mechanical and stylistic errors.Click here to get this question answered.

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Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.”

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” Pin It Remember in this course, you will develop one essay. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” In your essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the three reasons behind your decision. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” You have taken a marvelous, brave step on an educational journey. Congratulations! You have likely done a great deal of soul-searching to come to this enormous decision. The purpose of this essay, therefore, is for you to tell your readers (your instructor and your classmates) why you came to this decision. In your “Changing Our Lives” essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the reasons behind your decision. In this assignment, you will take the next step of the essay writing process by creating an outline to help you organize your ideas for your essay. Download the "Outline Template" by clicking this link. Please review the “Sample Student Outline” by clicking this link to download. "Sample Student Outline" can also be accessed by using the "Additional Resources" link in each week or by navigating to Student Center>Additional Resources. (Please do NOT write your whole essay in this assignment. We will create the essay step-by-step each week for final submission in Week 10. Creating your outline is the next step in creating your essay.) Create a topic outline in which you: Use the outline template located in the course shell to create a topic outline. Use short phrases and NOT complete sentences. Identify at least three (3) main points. Identify at least two (2) supporting points for each main point. Minimize mechanical and stylistic errors.Essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” Pin It Remember in this course, you will develop one essay. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” In your essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the three reasons behind your decision. The subject of your essay for this course is “Changing Our Lives.” You have taken a marvelous, brave step on an educational journey. Congratulations! You have likely done a great deal of soul-searching to come to this enormous decision. The purpose of this essay, therefore, is for you to tell your readers (your instructor and your classmates) why you came to this decision. In your “Changing Our Lives” essay, you will address why you decided to go to college at this time in your life and state the reasons behind your decision. In this assignment, you will take the next step of the essay writing process by creating an outline to help you organize your ideas for your essay. Download the "Outline Template" by clicking this link. Please review the “Sample Student Outline” by clicking this link to download. "Sample Student Outline" can also be accessed by using the "Additional Resources" link in each week or by navigating to Student Center>Additional Resources. (Please do NOT write your whole essay in this assignment. We will create the essay step-by-step each week for final submission in Week 10. Creating your outline is the next step in creating your essay.) Create a topic outline in which you: Use the outline template located in the course shell to create a topic outline. Use short phrases and NOT complete sentences. Identify at least three (3) main points. Identify at least two (2) supporting points for each main point. Minimize mechanical and stylistic errors.Click here to get this question answered.

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In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in... Pin It After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in terms of the following required elements: Leadership role Leader as individual Social architect Change agent Ø Father as a manager with short-term goal orientation Ø Daughter as a leader with long-term goal orientation Relationship builder How can the daughter and father use the concept of moral compass to give direction to the implementation of a vision and contribute to the success and sustainability of the company? Required Formatting of the Paper #2: This report should be double spaced, 12-point font, and five to seven pages in length excluding the title page and reference page; Title page with your name, the course name, the date, and instructor’s name; Use headings; Writing should be clear and concise; Write in the third person; Use APA formatting for in-text citations and reference page. You are expected to paraphrase and not use quotes. Deductions will be taken when quotes are used and found to be unnecessary; No dictionary or encyclopedia definition or use of wiki files; Use outside credible sources; Submit the paper in the Assignment Folder. After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in... Pin It After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in terms of the following required elements: Leadership role Leader as individual Social architect Change agent Ø Father as a manager with short-term goal orientation Ø Daughter as a leader with long-term goal orientation Relationship builder How can the daughter and father use the concept of moral compass to give direction to the implementation of a vision and contribute to the success and sustainability of the company? Required Formatting of the Paper #2: This report should be double spaced, 12-point font, and five to seven pages in length excluding the title page and reference page; Title page with your name, the course name, the date, and instructor’s name; Use headings; Writing should be clear and concise; Write in the third person; Use APA formatting for in-text citations and reference page. You are expected to paraphrase and not use quotes. Deductions will be taken when quotes are used and found to be unnecessary; No dictionary or encyclopedia definition or use of wiki files; Use outside credible sources; Submit the paper in the Assignment Folder. Click here to get this question answered.

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Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Please work on the issues relating to productivity as mentioned below. Productivity has become important area of concern in all countries including Canada. Progressive improving resource productivity with lean manufacturing, higher usage of mechanized production, compulsions of scarcer and costlier supply with changing consumer preferences, technological advances making products obsolete at faster rate, stiff competition from newly emerging sources and many such changes happening in every country. Please find out the ways Canadian companies are trying to improve productivity in different sectors. You should give comparative analysis of few industries, major areas of changes being brought in, statistical data and productivity figures from reliable sources, reputed consultants’ reports, government documents to support your submission. Your write up should be of at least 1000 words and should include at least 6 references. Please send your write up to my UCW mailbox by 26th Sunday midnight. Wishing best,Please work on the issues relating to productivity as mentioned below. Productivity has become important area of concern in all countries including Canada. Progressive improving resource productivity with lean manufacturing, higher usage of mechanized production, compulsions of scarcer and costlier supply with changing consumer preferences, technological advances making products obsolete at faster rate, stiff competition from newly emerging sources and many such changes happening in every country. Please find out the ways Canadian companies are trying to improve productivity in different sectors. You should give comparative analysis of few industries, major areas of changes being brought in, statistical data and productivity figures from reliable sources, reputed consultants’ reports, government documents to support your submission. Your write up should be of at least 1000 words and should include at least 6 references. Please send your write up to my UCW mailbox by 26th Sunday midnight. Wishing best,Click here to get this question answered.

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In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in... Pin It After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in terms of the following required elements: Leadership role Leader as individual Social architect Change agent Ø Father as a manager with short-term goal orientation Ø Daughter as a leader with long-term goal orientation Relationship builder How can the daughter and father use the concept of moral compass to give direction to the implementation of a vision and contribute to the success and sustainability of the company? Required Formatting of the Paper #2: This report should be double spaced, 12-point font, and five to seven pages in length excluding the title page and reference page; Title page with your name, the course name, the date, and instructor’s name; Use headings; Writing should be clear and concise; Write in the third person; Use APA formatting for in-text citations and reference page. You are expected to paraphrase and not use quotes. Deductions will be taken when quotes are used and found to be unnecessary; No dictionary or encyclopedia definition or use of wiki files; Use outside credible sources; Submit the paper in the Assignment Folder. After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in... Pin It After reading the case study, create a leadership plan. In creating the leadership plan, discuss the daughter and father in terms of the following required elements: Leadership role Leader as individual Social architect Change agent Ø Father as a manager with short-term goal orientation Ø Daughter as a leader with long-term goal orientation Relationship builder How can the daughter and father use the concept of moral compass to give direction to the implementation of a vision and contribute to the success and sustainability of the company? Required Formatting of the Paper #2: This report should be double spaced, 12-point font, and five to seven pages in length excluding the title page and reference page; Title page with your name, the course name, the date, and instructor’s name; Use headings; Writing should be clear and concise; Write in the third person; Use APA formatting for in-text citations and reference page. You are expected to paraphrase and not use quotes. Deductions will be taken when quotes are used and found to be unnecessary; No dictionary or encyclopedia definition or use of wiki files; Use outside credible sources; Submit the paper in the Assignment Folder. Click here to get this question answered.

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characteristic of behavior questions?

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Question 1 (1 point) Which of the following is a characteristic of behavior questions? Question 1 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents about things they do or have done C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of behavior questions. Save Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is not an characteristic of factual questions? Question 2 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents what they think about a specific issue or event. C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of factual questions. Save ________________________________________ Question 3 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Identify each type of question being asked on this survey. Question 3 options: 'Would you support higher taxes to fund the redevelopment of downtown?' Yes No 'Do you plan to vote in the next mayoral election?' Yes No 'When is the next mayoral election in Wind Valley?' This year, Next year, In two years 'Did you graduate from Wind Valley High School?' Yes No 'Do you think taxes are too high in Wind Valley?' Yes No 1. Opinion 2. Factual 3. Behavior 4. Knowledge Save ________________________________________ Question 4 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Match each item with the correct part of the survey. Question 4 options: 'Are you a homeowner residing in Wind Valley?' Yes No 'Would you support higher property taxes to improve the libary services?' 'How long have you owned a home in Wind Valley?' 10 years 'How often do you use the town's library?' Weekly, Monthly, Never Hi, I am Wendy Victor, city manager of Wind Valley. I am collecting information from homeowners of Wind Valley concerning our town's libary and the services it offers. Would you mind answering a few questions. This will only take a few minutes 1. Main Questions 2. Demographic Questions 3. First Question 4. Introduction Save ________________________________________ Question 5 (1 point) A community survey sent interviewers out into the community to interview residents about the presence of police in the community and incidence of crime. Some of the survey questions are shown below. Identify each question as open-ended or closed-ended. Question 5 options: Do you use public transportation? Yes No How long have you lived in this community? 10 years Identify at least two factors that you feel are most important to preventing crime in your neighborhood. If you attended college, what was your major? Have you been a victim of crime in your neighborhood? Yes No What is your household income? <$30,000; $30,000-$50,000, <$50,000 1. Closed-ended 2. Open-ended Save ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) A nursing home is surveying their residents about services available in the facilty. One of the survey questions appears below: How often do you use or participate in the following services or activities? a. The Beauty and Barber Shop __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never b. Crafts __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never c. Card and Game Night __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never Which of the following is a valid concern about these questions? Question 6 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own answers. B) There are two many services listed. C) There should be fewer choices. It would be best to use 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'never.' D) The wording is unclear. The terms 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'rarely' are not well-defined. Save Question 7 (1 point) The city of Boomtown asks each employee who ends their employment voluntarily to answer this question: What is the main reason you are resigning your position? Select at most two reasons: __ Lack of Job satisfaction __ Disagreement with supervisor __ Insufficient Salary __ Discrimination __ Workload was too heavy __ Sexual harassment __ Discrimination __ Poor physical working conditions __ Other, specify _______________ Which of the following is not a valid concern about this question? Question 7 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own reasons. B) People may select more than two reasons. C) All of the responses are negative. People may be leaving to return to school, for a better job, partner is relocating, etc. D) The list of possible responses is long and people may find it tedious to read through all of the possible responses. E) These are all valid concerns about this question. Save Question 8 (1 point) Evaluate this question: "Do you oppose measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?" Question 8 options: A) The question is clearly worded. B) It would be better to offer answer choices like Yes, No, Maybe. C) The question wording is very confusing. What 'measures' are being discussed? What is meant by 'promoting'? D) It would be better to word the question in a positive way: 'Do you support measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?' Save Question 9 (1 point) A statewide professional organization conducted a survey of its members. The survey included two open-ended questions on the effectiveness of the association's activities. A review of the returned questionnaires suggest that most association members answered these two questions You have been asked to make an initial report on the survey findings. You do not have time to examine all of the 600 responses to the two open-ended questions. Suggest a strategy for including information from these two open-ended questions in your report. Question 9 options: A) Tally the responses to the two open-ended questions to the best of your ability during the time frame. B) Select the first 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. C) Select the last 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. D) Take a small random sample of the questionnaires and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. Save Question 10 (1 point) Which the following is not a step used in writing an effective survey instrument? Question 10 options: A) Create a model to guide development of the survey questions B) Determine if a survey is really necessary C) Pretest the survey items D) Pilot test the survey using the planned data collection method E) Never analyze the data from the pilot test since it may bias your approach to later analyses Save ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) It is generally advisable to place demographic questions such as gender, race/ethnicity, income, etc near the beginning of a survey to make sure that each respondent completes these items. Question 11 options: A) True B) False Save Question 12 (1 point) Loaded questions are worded so that the respondent cannot give an acceptable answer. Question 12 options: A) True B) False Save Question 13 (1 point) A biased question is worded so that it encourages respondents to give one answer over another, eliciting inaccurate information. Question 13 options: A) True B) False Save Question 14 (1 point) Operational validity is not affected by the number of questions on a survey. Question 14 options: A) True B) False Save Question 1 (1 point) Which of the following is a characteristic of behavior questions? Question 1 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents about things they do or have done C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of behavior questions. Save Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is not an characteristic of factual questions? Question 2 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents what they think about a specific issue or event. C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of factual questions. Save ________________________________________ Question 3 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Identify each type of question being asked on this survey. Question 3 options: 'Would you support higher taxes to fund the redevelopment of downtown?' Yes No 'Do you plan to vote in the next mayoral election?' Yes No 'When is the next mayoral election in Wind Valley?' This year, Next year, In two years 'Did you graduate from Wind Valley High School?' Yes No 'Do you think taxes are too high in Wind Valley?' Yes No 1. Opinion 2. Factual 3. Behavior 4. Knowledge Save ________________________________________ Question 4 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Match each item with the correct part of the survey. Question 4 options: 'Are you a homeowner residing in Wind Valley?' Yes No 'Would you support higher property taxes to improve the libary services?' 'How long have you owned a home in Wind Valley?' 10 years 'How often do you use the town's library?' Weekly, Monthly, Never Hi, I am Wendy Victor, city manager of Wind Valley. I am collecting information from homeowners of Wind Valley concerning our town's libary and the services it offers. Would you mind answering a few questions. This will only take a few minutes 1. Main Questions 2. Demographic Questions 3. First Question 4. Introduction Save ________________________________________ Question 5 (1 point) A community survey sent interviewers out into the community to interview residents about the presence of police in the community and incidence of crime. Some of the survey questions are shown below. Identify each question as open-ended or closed-ended. Question 5 options: Do you use public transportation? Yes No How long have you lived in this community? 10 years Identify at least two factors that you feel are most important to preventing crime in your neighborhood. If you attended college, what was your major? Have you been a victim of crime in your neighborhood? Yes No What is your household income? <$30,000; $30,000-$50,000, <$50,000 1. Closed-ended 2. Open-ended Save ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) A nursing home is surveying their residents about services available in the facilty. One of the survey questions appears below: How often do you use or participate in the following services or activities? a. The Beauty and Barber Shop __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never b. Crafts __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never c. Card and Game Night __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never Which of the following is a valid concern about these questions? Question 6 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own answers. B) There are two many services listed. C) There should be fewer choices. It would be best to use 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'never.' D) The wording is unclear. The terms 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'rarely' are not well-defined. Save Question 7 (1 point) The city of Boomtown asks each employee who ends their employment voluntarily to answer this question: What is the main reason you are resigning your position? Select at most two reasons: __ Lack of Job satisfaction __ Disagreement with supervisor __ Insufficient Salary __ Discrimination __ Workload was too heavy __ Sexual harassment __ Discrimination __ Poor physical working conditions __ Other, specify _______________ Which of the following is not a valid concern about this question? Question 7 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own reasons. B) People may select more than two reasons. C) All of the responses are negative. People may be leaving to return to school, for a better job, partner is relocating, etc. D) The list of possible responses is long and people may find it tedious to read through all of the possible responses. E) These are all valid concerns about this question. Save Question 8 (1 point) Evaluate this question: "Do you oppose measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?" Question 8 options: A) The question is clearly worded. B) It would be better to offer answer choices like Yes, No, Maybe. C) The question wording is very confusing. What 'measures' are being discussed? What is meant by 'promoting'? D) It would be better to word the question in a positive way: 'Do you support measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?' Save Question 9 (1 point) A statewide professional organization conducted a survey of its members. The survey included two open-ended questions on the effectiveness of the association's activities. A review of the returned questionnaires suggest that most association members answered these two questions You have been asked to make an initial report on the survey findings. You do not have time to examine all of the 600 responses to the two open-ended questions. Suggest a strategy for including information from these two open-ended questions in your report. Question 9 options: A) Tally the responses to the two open-ended questions to the best of your ability during the time frame. B) Select the first 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. C) Select the last 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. D) Take a small random sample of the questionnaires and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. Save Question 10 (1 point) Which the following is not a step used in writing an effective survey instrument? Question 10 options: A) Create a model to guide development of the survey questions B) Determine if a survey is really necessary C) Pretest the survey items D) Pilot test the survey using the planned data collection method E) Never analyze the data from the pilot test since it may bias your approach to later analyses Save ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) It is generally advisable to place demographic questions such as gender, race/ethnicity, income, etc near the beginning of a survey to make sure that each respondent completes these items. Question 11 options: A) True B) False Save Question 12 (1 point) Loaded questions are worded so that the respondent cannot give an acceptable answer. Question 12 options: A) True B) False Save Question 13 (1 point) A biased question is worded so that it encourages respondents to give one answer over another, eliciting inaccurate information. Question 13 options: A) True B) False Save Question 14 (1 point) Operational validity is not affected by the number of questions on a survey. Question 14 options: A) True B) False Save Click here to get this question answered.

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Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Please work on the issues relating to productivity as mentioned below. Productivity has become important area of concern in all countries including Canada. Progressive improving resource productivity with lean manufacturing, higher usage of mechanized production, compulsions of scarcer and costlier supply with changing consumer preferences, technological advances making products obsolete at faster rate, stiff competition from newly emerging sources and many such changes happening in every country. Please find out the ways Canadian companies are trying to improve productivity in different sectors. You should give comparative analysis of few industries, major areas of changes being brought in, statistical data and productivity figures from reliable sources, reputed consultants’ reports, government documents to support your submission. Your write up should be of at least 1000 words and should include at least 6 references. Please send your write up to my UCW mailbox by 26th Sunday midnight. Wishing best,Please work on the issues relating to productivity as mentioned below. Productivity has become important area of concern in all countries including Canada. Progressive improving resource productivity with lean manufacturing, higher usage of mechanized production, compulsions of scarcer and costlier supply with changing consumer preferences, technological advances making products obsolete at faster rate, stiff competition from newly emerging sources and many such changes happening in every country. Please find out the ways Canadian companies are trying to improve productivity in different sectors. You should give comparative analysis of few industries, major areas of changes being brought in, statistical data and productivity figures from reliable sources, reputed consultants’ reports, government documents to support your submission. Your write up should be of at least 1000 words and should include at least 6 references. Please send your write up to my UCW mailbox by 26th Sunday midnight. Wishing best,Click here to get this question answered.

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Information Needs

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Information Needs for the AIS Pin It In 1967, Russell Ackoff presented a classical analysis of misinformation in management ((COPPIED AT THE BOTTOM)) Now, you need to fast-forward to the present. After reading the case, craft your own version of misinformation in management by developing five (5) key incorrect assumptions that management makes about its accounting information systems. For this assignment, research the Internet for information related to improper assumptions concerning accounting information systems. Write a five to seven (5-7) page paper in which you: 1. Based on your research, assess how corporate leaders may make improper assumptions related to accounting information systems and the related information. Indicate the most negative potential impacts on business operations related to these assumptions. Provide support for your rationale. 2. Suggest three to four (3-4) ways in which organizational performance may be improved when information is properly managed within a business system. Provide support for your rationale. 3. Evaluate the level of system security (i.e., high, medium, low) needed to ensure information integrity within automated business systems. Provide support for your evaluation. 4. Use at least three (3) quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar Websites do not qualify as quality resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: · Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. 1 REQUIRED: Read the five assumptions, contentions, and Ackoff’s explanation. For each of the five, decide if you agree or disagree with Ackoff’s contentions. Defend your stand by preparing a report to explain your beliefs. Be prepared to defend your beliefs in class. ASSUMPTION 1: MANAGEMENT NEEDS MORE INFORMATION Assumption 1. Most management information systems (MISs) are designed based on the assumption that the critical deficiency under which most managers operate is the lack of relevant information. Contention 1. I do not deny that most managers lack a good deal of information that they should have, but I do deny that this is the most important informational deficiency from which they suffer. It seems to me that they suffer more from an overabundance of irrelevant information. This is not a play on words. The consequences of changing the emphasis of an MIS from supplying relevant information to eliminating irrelevant information is considerable. If one is preoccupied with supplying relevant information, attention is almost exclusively given to the generation, storage, and retrieval of information; hence, emphasis is placed on constructing data banks, coding, indexing, updating files, using access languages, and so on. The ideal that has emerged from this orientation is an infinite pool of data into which managers can reach to pull out any information they want. If, however, one sees the manager’s information problem primarily, but not exclusively, as one that arises out of an overabundance of irrelevant information, most of which was not asked for, then the two most important functions of an information system become filtration (or evaluation) and condensation. The literature on the MIS seldom refers to these functions, let alone considers how to carry them out. My experience indicates that most managers receive much more data (if not information) than they can possibly absorb even if they spend all of their time trying to do so. Hence they already suffer from an information overload. They must spend a great deal of time separating the relevant documents. For example, I have found that I receive an average of 43 hours of unsolicited reading material each week. The solicited material is usually half again this amount. I have seen a daily stock status report that consists of approximately 600 pages of computer printout. The report is circulated daily across managers’ desks. I’ve also seen requests for major capital expenditures that come in book size, several of which are distributed to managers each week. It is not uncommon for many managers to receive an average of one journal a day or more. One could go on and on. Unless the information overload to which managers are subjected is reduced, any additional information made available by an MIS cannot be expected to be used effectively. Even relevant documents have too much redundancy. Most documents can be considerably condensed without loss of content. My point here is best made, perhaps, by describing This case is adapted from a classic article entitled “Management Misinformation Systems.” It was written by Russell L. Ackoff and appeared in Management Sciences. In the article, Ackoff identified five common assumptions about information systems and then explained why he disagreed with them. Case 1-2 Ackoff’s Management Misinformation Systems 2 CASE 1-2 briefly an experiment that a few of my colleagues and I conducted on the operations research (OR) literature several years ago. By using a panel of well-known experts, we identified four OR articles that all members of the panel considered to be “above average” and four articles that were considered to be “below average.” The authors of the eight articles were asked to prepare “objective” examinations (duration 30 minutes) plus answers for graduate students who were to be assigned the articles for reading. (The authors were not informed about the experiment.) Then several experienced writers were asked to reduce each article to two-thirds and one-third of its original length only by eliminating words. They also prepared a brief abstract of each article. Those who did the condensing did not see the examinations to be given to the students. A group of graduate students who had not previously read the articles was then selected. Each one was given four articles randomly selected, each of which was in one of its four versions: 100 percent, 67 percent, 33 percent, or abstract. Each version of each article was read by two students. All were given the same examinations. The average scores on the examinations were compared. For the above-average articles there was no significant difference between average test scores for the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant decrease in average test scores for those who had read only the abstract. For the below-average articles there was no difference in average test scores among those who had read the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant increase in average test scores of those who had read only the abstract. The sample used was obviously too small for general conclusions, but the results strongly indicate the extent to which even good writing can be condensed without loss of information. I refrain from drawing the obvious conclusions about bad writing. It seems clear that condensation as well as filtration, performed mechanically or otherwise, should be an essential part of an MIS, and that such a system should be capable of handling much, if not all, of the unsolicited as well as solicited information that a manager receives. ASSUMPTION 2: MANAGERS NEED THE INFORMATION THEY WANT Assumption 2. Most MIS designers “determine” what information is needed by asking managers what information they would like to have. This is based on the assumption that managers know what information they need and want. Contention 2. For a manager to know what information he needs, he must be aware of each type of decision he should (as well as does) make and he must have an adequate model of each. These conditions are seldom satisfied. Most managers have some conception of at least some of the types of decisions they must make. Their conceptions, however, are likely to be deficient in a very critical way, a way that follows from an important principle of scientific economy: The less we understand a phenomenon, the more variables we require to explain it. Hence managers who do not understand the phenomena they control play it “safe” and, with respect to information, want “everything.” The MIS designer, who has even less understanding of the relevant phenomena than the manager, tries to provide even more than everything. She thereby increases what is already an overload of irrelevant information. For example, market researchers in a major oil company once asked their marketing managers what variables they thought were relevant in estimating the sales volume of future service stations. Almost 70 variables were identified. The market researchers then added about half again this many variables and performed a large multiple linear regression analysis of sales of existing stations against these variables and found about 35 to be statistically significant. A forecasting equation was based on this analysis. An OR team subsequently constructed a model based on only one of these variables, traffic flow, CASE 1-2 3 which predicted sales better than the 35-variable regression equation. The team went on to explain sales at service stations in terms of the customers’ perception of the amount of time lost by stopping for service. The relevance of all but a few of the variables used by the market researchers could be explained by their effect on such a perception. The moral is simple: One cannot specify what information is required for decision making until an explanatory model of the decision process and the system involved has been constructed and tested. Information systems are subsystems of control systems. They cannot be designed adequately without taking control into account. Furthermore, whatever else regression analyses can yield, they cannot yield understanding and explanation of phenomena. They describe and, at best, predict. ASSUMPTION 3: GIVING MANAGERS THE INFORMATION THEY NEED IMPROVES THEIR DECISION MAKING Assumption 3. It is frequently assumed that if managers are provided with the information they need, they will then have no problem in using it effectively. Contention 3. Operations research (an academic subject area dealing with the application of mathematical models and techniques to business decisions) stands to the contrary. Give most managers an initial tableau of a typical “real” mathematical programming, sequencing, or network problem and see how close they come to an optimal solution. If their experience and judgment have any value, they may not do badly, but they will seldom do very well. In most management problems there are too many possibilities to expect experience, judgment, or intuition to provide good guesses, even with perfect information. Furthermore, when several probabilities are involved in a problem, the unguided mind of even a manager has difficulty in aggregating them in a valid way. We all know many simple problems in probability in which untutored intuition usually does very badly (e.g., What are the correct odds that 2 of 25 people selected at random will have their birthdays on the same day of the year?). For example, very few of the results obtained by queuing theory, when arrivals and service are probabilistic, are obvious to managers; nor are the results of risk analysis where the managers’ own subjective estimates of probabilities are used. The moral: It is necessary to determine how well managers can use needed information. When, because of the complexity of the decision process, they cannot use it well, they should be provided with either decision rules or performance feedback so that they can identify and learn from their mistakes. ASSUMPTION 4: MORE COMMUNICATION MEANS BETTER PERFORMANCE Assumption 4. The characteristic of most MISs is that they provide managers with better current information about what other managers and their departments are doing. Underlying this provision is the belief that better interdepartmental communication enables managers to coordinate their decisions more effectively and hence improves the organization’s overall performance. Contention 4. Not only is this not necessarily so, but it seldom is so. One would hardly expect two competing companies to become more cooperative because the information each acquires about the other is improved. For example, consider the following very much simplified version of a situation I once ran into. The simplification of the case does not affect any of its essential characteristics. A department store has two “line” operations: buying and selling. Each function is performed by a separate department. The Purchasing Department primarily controls one variable: how much of each item is bought. The Merchandising Department controls the price at which it is sold. Typically, the measure of performance applied to the Purchasing Department was the turnover rate of inventory. The measure applied to the Merchandising Department was gross sales; this department sought to maximize the number of items sold times their price. Now by examining a single item, let us consider what happens in this system. The merchandising manager, using his knowledge of competition and consumption, set a price that he judged would maximize gross sales. In doing so, he utilized price-demand curves for each type of item. For each price the curves show the expected sales and values on an upper and lower confidence band as well (see Figure 1). When instructing the Purchasing Department about how many items to make available, the merchandising manager quite naturally used the value on the upper confidence curve. This minimized the chances of his running short, which, if it occurred, would hurt his performance. It also maximized the chances of being overstocked, but this was not his concern, only the purchasing manager’s. Say, therefore, that the merchandising manager initially selected price P1 and requested that amount Q1 be made available by the Purchasing Department. In this company the purchasing manager also had access to the price-demand curves. She knew that the merchandising manager always ordered optimistically. Therefore, using the same curve, she read over from Q1 to the upper limit and down to the expected value, from which she obtained Q2, the quantity she actually intended to make available. She did not intend to pay for the merchandising manager’s optimism. If merchandising ran out of stock, it was not her worry. Now the merchandising manager was informed about what the purchasing manager had done, so he adjusted his price to P2. The purchasing manager in turn was told that the merchandising manager had made this readjustment, so she planned to make only Q3 available. If this process (made possible only by perfect communication between departments) had been allowed to continue, nothing would have been bought and nothing would have been sold. This outcome was avoided by prohibiting communication between the two departments and forcing each to guess what the other was doing. I have obviously caricatured the situation in order to make the point clear: When organizational units have inappropriate measures of performance that put them in conflict with each other, as is often the case, communication between them may hurt organizational performance, not help it. Organizational structure and performance measurement must be taken into account before opening the floodgates and permitting the free flow of information between parts of the organization. ASSUMPTION 5: MANAGERS NEED ONLY TO UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE AN INFORMATION SYSTEM Assumption 5. A manager does not have to understand how an information system works, only how to use it. Contention 5. Managers must understand their MIS or they are handicapped and cannot properly operate and control their company. Most MIS designers seek to make their systems as innocuous and unobtrusive as possible to managers, lest they become frightened. The designers try to provide managers with very easy 4 CASE 1-2 Optimistic Expected Pessimistic P1 P2 P3 Q1 Q2 Q3Demand Price Figure 1 access to the system and assure them that they need to know nothing more about it. The designers usually succeed in keeping managers ignorant in this regard. This leaves managers unable to evaluate the MIS as a whole. It often makes them afraid to even try to do so, lest they display their ignorance publicly. In failing to evaluate their MIS, managers delegate much of the control of the organization to the system’s designers and operators—who may have many virtues, but managerial competence is seldom among them. Let me cite a case in point. A chairman of the board of a midsize company asked for help on the following problem. One of his larger (decentralized) divisions had installed a computerized production inventory control and manufacturing manager information system about a year earlier. It had acquired about $2 million worth of equipment to do so. The board chairman had just received a request from the division for permission to replace the original equipment with newly announced equipment that would cost several times the original amount. An extensive “justification” for so doing was provided with the request. The chairman wanted to know whether the request was justified. He admitted to complete incompetence in this connection. A meeting was arranged at the division, at which I was subjected to an extended and detailed briefing. The system was large but relatively simple. At the heart of it was a reorder point for each item and a maximum allowable stock level. Reorder quantities took lead time as well as the allowable maximum into account. The computer kept track of stock, ordered items when required, and generated numerous reports on both the state of the system it controlled and its own “actions.” When the briefing was over, I was asked if I had any questions. I did. First I asked if, when the system had been installed, there had been many parts whose stock level exceeded the maximum amount possible under the new system. I was told there were many. I asked for a list of about 30 and for some graph paper. Both were provided. With the help of the system designer and volumes of old daily reports I began to plot the stock level of the first listed item over time. When this item reached the maximum “allowable” stock level, it had been reordered. The system designer was surprised and said that by sheer “luck” I had found one of the few errors made by the system. Continued plotting showed that because of repeated premature reordering the item had never gone much below the maximum stock level. Clearly, the program was confusing the maximum allowable stock level and the reorder point. This turned out to be the case in more than half of the items on the list. Next I asked if they had many paired parts, ones that were only used with each other, for example, matched nuts and bolts. They had many. A list was produced and we began checking the previous day’s withdrawals. For more than half of the pairs the differences in the numbers recorded as withdrawn were very large. No explanation was provided. Before the day was out it was possible to show by some quick and dirty calculations that the new computerized system was costing the company almost $150,000 per month more than the hand system that it had replaced, most of this in excess inventories. The recommendation was that the system be redesigned as quickly as possible and that the new equipment not be authorized for the time being. The questions asked of the system had been obvious and simple ones. Managers should have been able to ask them, but—and this is the point—they felt themselves incompetent to do so. They would not have allowed a hand-operated system to get so far out of their control. No MIS should ever be installed unless the managers for whom it is intended are trained to evaluate and hence control it rather than be controlled by it. Source: Reprinted by permission of Russell L. Ackoff, “Management Misinformation Systems,” Management Sciences 14, no. 4 (December 1967). The Institute of Management Sciences, 290 Westminster Street, Providence, R.I. 02903. CASE 1-2 5Information Needs for the AIS Pin It In 1967, Russell Ackoff presented a classical analysis of misinformation in management ((COPPIED AT THE BOTTOM)) Now, you need to fast-forward to the present. After reading the case, craft your own version of misinformation in management by developing five (5) key incorrect assumptions that management makes about its accounting information systems. For this assignment, research the Internet for information related to improper assumptions concerning accounting information systems. Write a five to seven (5-7) page paper in which you: 1. Based on your research, assess how corporate leaders may make improper assumptions related to accounting information systems and the related information. Indicate the most negative potential impacts on business operations related to these assumptions. Provide support for your rationale. 2. Suggest three to four (3-4) ways in which organizational performance may be improved when information is properly managed within a business system. Provide support for your rationale. 3. Evaluate the level of system security (i.e., high, medium, low) needed to ensure information integrity within automated business systems. Provide support for your evaluation. 4. Use at least three (3) quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar Websites do not qualify as quality resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: · Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. 1 REQUIRED: Read the five assumptions, contentions, and Ackoff’s explanation. For each of the five, decide if you agree or disagree with Ackoff’s contentions. Defend your stand by preparing a report to explain your beliefs. Be prepared to defend your beliefs in class. ASSUMPTION 1: MANAGEMENT NEEDS MORE INFORMATION Assumption 1. Most management information systems (MISs) are designed based on the assumption that the critical deficiency under which most managers operate is the lack of relevant information. Contention 1. I do not deny that most managers lack a good deal of information that they should have, but I do deny that this is the most important informational deficiency from which they suffer. It seems to me that they suffer more from an overabundance of irrelevant information. This is not a play on words. The consequences of changing the emphasis of an MIS from supplying relevant information to eliminating irrelevant information is considerable. If one is preoccupied with supplying relevant information, attention is almost exclusively given to the generation, storage, and retrieval of information; hence, emphasis is placed on constructing data banks, coding, indexing, updating files, using access languages, and so on. The ideal that has emerged from this orientation is an infinite pool of data into which managers can reach to pull out any information they want. If, however, one sees the manager’s information problem primarily, but not exclusively, as one that arises out of an overabundance of irrelevant information, most of which was not asked for, then the two most important functions of an information system become filtration (or evaluation) and condensation. The literature on the MIS seldom refers to these functions, let alone considers how to carry them out. My experience indicates that most managers receive much more data (if not information) than they can possibly absorb even if they spend all of their time trying to do so. Hence they already suffer from an information overload. They must spend a great deal of time separating the relevant documents. For example, I have found that I receive an average of 43 hours of unsolicited reading material each week. The solicited material is usually half again this amount. I have seen a daily stock status report that consists of approximately 600 pages of computer printout. The report is circulated daily across managers’ desks. I’ve also seen requests for major capital expenditures that come in book size, several of which are distributed to managers each week. It is not uncommon for many managers to receive an average of one journal a day or more. One could go on and on. Unless the information overload to which managers are subjected is reduced, any additional information made available by an MIS cannot be expected to be used effectively. Even relevant documents have too much redundancy. Most documents can be considerably condensed without loss of content. My point here is best made, perhaps, by describing This case is adapted from a classic article entitled “Management Misinformation Systems.” It was written by Russell L. Ackoff and appeared in Management Sciences. In the article, Ackoff identified five common assumptions about information systems and then explained why he disagreed with them. Case 1-2 Ackoff’s Management Misinformation Systems 2 CASE 1-2 briefly an experiment that a few of my colleagues and I conducted on the operations research (OR) literature several years ago. By using a panel of well-known experts, we identified four OR articles that all members of the panel considered to be “above average” and four articles that were considered to be “below average.” The authors of the eight articles were asked to prepare “objective” examinations (duration 30 minutes) plus answers for graduate students who were to be assigned the articles for reading. (The authors were not informed about the experiment.) Then several experienced writers were asked to reduce each article to two-thirds and one-third of its original length only by eliminating words. They also prepared a brief abstract of each article. Those who did the condensing did not see the examinations to be given to the students. A group of graduate students who had not previously read the articles was then selected. Each one was given four articles randomly selected, each of which was in one of its four versions: 100 percent, 67 percent, 33 percent, or abstract. Each version of each article was read by two students. All were given the same examinations. The average scores on the examinations were compared. For the above-average articles there was no significant difference between average test scores for the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant decrease in average test scores for those who had read only the abstract. For the below-average articles there was no difference in average test scores among those who had read the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant increase in average test scores of those who had read only the abstract. The sample used was obviously too small for general conclusions, but the results strongly indicate the extent to which even good writing can be condensed without loss of information. I refrain from drawing the obvious conclusions about bad writing. It seems clear that condensation as well as filtration, performed mechanically or otherwise, should be an essential part of an MIS, and that such a system should be capable of handling much, if not all, of the unsolicited as well as solicited information that a manager receives. ASSUMPTION 2: MANAGERS NEED THE INFORMATION THEY WANT Assumption 2. Most MIS designers “determine” what information is needed by asking managers what information they would like to have. This is based on the assumption that managers know what information they need and want. Contention 2. For a manager to know what information he needs, he must be aware of each type of decision he should (as well as does) make and he must have an adequate model of each. These conditions are seldom satisfied. Most managers have some conception of at least some of the types of decisions they must make. Their conceptions, however, are likely to be deficient in a very critical way, a way that follows from an important principle of scientific economy: The less we understand a phenomenon, the more variables we require to explain it. Hence managers who do not understand the phenomena they control play it “safe” and, with respect to information, want “everything.” The MIS designer, who has even less understanding of the relevant phenomena than the manager, tries to provide even more than everything. She thereby increases what is already an overload of irrelevant information. For example, market researchers in a major oil company once asked their marketing managers what variables they thought were relevant in estimating the sales volume of future service stations. Almost 70 variables were identified. The market researchers then added about half again this many variables and performed a large multiple linear regression analysis of sales of existing stations against these variables and found about 35 to be statistically significant. A forecasting equation was based on this analysis. An OR team subsequently constructed a model based on only one of these variables, traffic flow, CASE 1-2 3 which predicted sales better than the 35-variable regression equation. The team went on to explain sales at service stations in terms of the customers’ perception of the amount of time lost by stopping for service. The relevance of all but a few of the variables used by the market researchers could be explained by their effect on such a perception. The moral is simple: One cannot specify what information is required for decision making until an explanatory model of the decision process and the system involved has been constructed and tested. Information systems are subsystems of control systems. They cannot be designed adequately without taking control into account. Furthermore, whatever else regression analyses can yield, they cannot yield understanding and explanation of phenomena. They describe and, at best, predict. ASSUMPTION 3: GIVING MANAGERS THE INFORMATION THEY NEED IMPROVES THEIR DECISION MAKING Assumption 3. It is frequently assumed that if managers are provided with the information they need, they will then have no problem in using it effectively. Contention 3. Operations research (an academic subject area dealing with the application of mathematical models and techniques to business decisions) stands to the contrary. Give most managers an initial tableau of a typical “real” mathematical programming, sequencing, or network problem and see how close they come to an optimal solution. If their experience and judgment have any value, they may not do badly, but they will seldom do very well. In most management problems there are too many possibilities to expect experience, judgment, or intuition to provide good guesses, even with perfect information. Furthermore, when several probabilities are involved in a problem, the unguided mind of even a manager has difficulty in aggregating them in a valid way. We all know many simple problems in probability in which untutored intuition usually does very badly (e.g., What are the correct odds that 2 of 25 people selected at random will have their birthdays on the same day of the year?). For example, very few of the results obtained by queuing theory, when arrivals and service are probabilistic, are obvious to managers; nor are the results of risk analysis where the managers’ own subjective estimates of probabilities are used. The moral: It is necessary to determine how well managers can use needed information. When, because of the complexity of the decision process, they cannot use it well, they should be provided with either decision rules or performance feedback so that they can identify and learn from their mistakes. ASSUMPTION 4: MORE COMMUNICATION MEANS BETTER PERFORMANCE Assumption 4. The characteristic of most MISs is that they provide managers with better current information about what other managers and their departments are doing. Underlying this provision is the belief that better interdepartmental communication enables managers to coordinate their decisions more effectively and hence improves the organization’s overall performance. Contention 4. Not only is this not necessarily so, but it seldom is so. One would hardly expect two competing companies to become more cooperative because the information each acquires about the other is improved. For example, consider the following very much simplified version of a situation I once ran into. The simplification of the case does not affect any of its essential characteristics. A department store has two “line” operations: buying and selling. Each function is performed by a separate department. The Purchasing Department primarily controls one variable: how much of each item is bought. The Merchandising Department controls the price at which it is sold. Typically, the measure of performance applied to the Purchasing Department was the turnover rate of inventory. The measure applied to the Merchandising Department was gross sales; this department sought to maximize the number of items sold times their price. Now by examining a single item, let us consider what happens in this system. The merchandising manager, using his knowledge of competition and consumption, set a price that he judged would maximize gross sales. In doing so, he utilized price-demand curves for each type of item. For each price the curves show the expected sales and values on an upper and lower confidence band as well (see Figure 1). When instructing the Purchasing Department about how many items to make available, the merchandising manager quite naturally used the value on the upper confidence curve. This minimized the chances of his running short, which, if it occurred, would hurt his performance. It also maximized the chances of being overstocked, but this was not his concern, only the purchasing manager’s. Say, therefore, that the merchandising manager initially selected price P1 and requested that amount Q1 be made available by the Purchasing Department. In this company the purchasing manager also had access to the price-demand curves. She knew that the merchandising manager always ordered optimistically. Therefore, using the same curve, she read over from Q1 to the upper limit and down to the expected value, from which she obtained Q2, the quantity she actually intended to make available. She did not intend to pay for the merchandising manager’s optimism. If merchandising ran out of stock, it was not her worry. Now the merchandising manager was informed about what the purchasing manager had done, so he adjusted his price to P2. The purchasing manager in turn was told that the merchandising manager had made this readjustment, so she planned to make only Q3 available. If this process (made possible only by perfect communication between departments) had been allowed to continue, nothing would have been bought and nothing would have been sold. This outcome was avoided by prohibiting communication between the two departments and forcing each to guess what the other was doing. I have obviously caricatured the situation in order to make the point clear: When organizational units have inappropriate measures of performance that put them in conflict with each other, as is often the case, communication between them may hurt organizational performance, not help it. Organizational structure and performance measurement must be taken into account before opening the floodgates and permitting the free flow of information between parts of the organization. ASSUMPTION 5: MANAGERS NEED ONLY TO UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE AN INFORMATION SYSTEM Assumption 5. A manager does not have to understand how an information system works, only how to use it. Contention 5. Managers must understand their MIS or they are handicapped and cannot properly operate and control their company. Most MIS designers seek to make their systems as innocuous and unobtrusive as possible to managers, lest they become frightened. The designers try to provide managers with very easy 4 CASE 1-2 Optimistic Expected Pessimistic P1 P2 P3 Q1 Q2 Q3Demand Price Figure 1 access to the system and assure them that they need to know nothing more about it. The designers usually succeed in keeping managers ignorant in this regard. This leaves managers unable to evaluate the MIS as a whole. It often makes them afraid to even try to do so, lest they display their ignorance publicly. In failing to evaluate their MIS, managers delegate much of the control of the organization to the system’s designers and operators—who may have many virtues, but managerial competence is seldom among them. Let me cite a case in point. A chairman of the board of a midsize company asked for help on the following problem. One of his larger (decentralized) divisions had installed a computerized production inventory control and manufacturing manager information system about a year earlier. It had acquired about $2 million worth of equipment to do so. The board chairman had just received a request from the division for permission to replace the original equipment with newly announced equipment that would cost several times the original amount. An extensive “justification” for so doing was provided with the request. The chairman wanted to know whether the request was justified. He admitted to complete incompetence in this connection. A meeting was arranged at the division, at which I was subjected to an extended and detailed briefing. The system was large but relatively simple. At the heart of it was a reorder point for each item and a maximum allowable stock level. Reorder quantities took lead time as well as the allowable maximum into account. The computer kept track of stock, ordered items when required, and generated numerous reports on both the state of the system it controlled and its own “actions.” When the briefing was over, I was asked if I had any questions. I did. First I asked if, when the system had been installed, there had been many parts whose stock level exceeded the maximum amount possible under the new system. I was told there were many. I asked for a list of about 30 and for some graph paper. Both were provided. With the help of the system designer and volumes of old daily reports I began to plot the stock level of the first listed item over time. When this item reached the maximum “allowable” stock level, it had been reordered. The system designer was surprised and said that by sheer “luck” I had found one of the few errors made by the system. Continued plotting showed that because of repeated premature reordering the item had never gone much below the maximum stock level. Clearly, the program was confusing the maximum allowable stock level and the reorder point. This turned out to be the case in more than half of the items on the list. Next I asked if they had many paired parts, ones that were only used with each other, for example, matched nuts and bolts. They had many. A list was produced and we began checking the previous day’s withdrawals. For more than half of the pairs the differences in the numbers recorded as withdrawn were very large. No explanation was provided. Before the day was out it was possible to show by some quick and dirty calculations that the new computerized system was costing the company almost $150,000 per month more than the hand system that it had replaced, most of this in excess inventories. The recommendation was that the system be redesigned as quickly as possible and that the new equipment not be authorized for the time being. The questions asked of the system had been obvious and simple ones. Managers should have been able to ask them, but—and this is the point—they felt themselves incompetent to do so. They would not have allowed a hand-operated system to get so far out of their control. No MIS should ever be installed unless the managers for whom it is intended are trained to evaluate and hence control it rather than be controlled by it. Source: Reprinted by permission of Russell L. Ackoff, “Management Misinformation Systems,” Management Sciences 14, no. 4 (December 1967). The Institute of Management Sciences, 290 Westminster Street, Providence, R.I. 02903. CASE 1-2 5Click here to get this question answered.

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characteristic of behavior questions?

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Question 1 (1 point) Which of the following is a characteristic of behavior questions? Question 1 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents about things they do or have done C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of behavior questions. Save Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is not an characteristic of factual questions? Question 2 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents what they think about a specific issue or event. C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of factual questions. Save ________________________________________ Question 3 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Identify each type of question being asked on this survey. Question 3 options: 'Would you support higher taxes to fund the redevelopment of downtown?' Yes No 'Do you plan to vote in the next mayoral election?' Yes No 'When is the next mayoral election in Wind Valley?' This year, Next year, In two years 'Did you graduate from Wind Valley High School?' Yes No 'Do you think taxes are too high in Wind Valley?' Yes No 1. Opinion 2. Factual 3. Behavior 4. Knowledge Save ________________________________________ Question 4 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Match each item with the correct part of the survey. Question 4 options: 'Are you a homeowner residing in Wind Valley?' Yes No 'Would you support higher property taxes to improve the libary services?' 'How long have you owned a home in Wind Valley?' 10 years 'How often do you use the town's library?' Weekly, Monthly, Never Hi, I am Wendy Victor, city manager of Wind Valley. I am collecting information from homeowners of Wind Valley concerning our town's libary and the services it offers. Would you mind answering a few questions. This will only take a few minutes 1. Main Questions 2. Demographic Questions 3. First Question 4. Introduction Save ________________________________________ Question 5 (1 point) A community survey sent interviewers out into the community to interview residents about the presence of police in the community and incidence of crime. Some of the survey questions are shown below. Identify each question as open-ended or closed-ended. Question 5 options: Do you use public transportation? Yes No How long have you lived in this community? 10 years Identify at least two factors that you feel are most important to preventing crime in your neighborhood. If you attended college, what was your major? Have you been a victim of crime in your neighborhood? Yes No What is your household income? <$30,000; $30,000-$50,000, <$50,000 1. Closed-ended 2. Open-ended Save ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) A nursing home is surveying their residents about services available in the facilty. One of the survey questions appears below: How often do you use or participate in the following services or activities? a. The Beauty and Barber Shop __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never b. Crafts __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never c. Card and Game Night __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never Which of the following is a valid concern about these questions? Question 6 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own answers. B) There are two many services listed. C) There should be fewer choices. It would be best to use 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'never.' D) The wording is unclear. The terms 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'rarely' are not well-defined. Save Question 7 (1 point) The city of Boomtown asks each employee who ends their employment voluntarily to answer this question: What is the main reason you are resigning your position? Select at most two reasons: __ Lack of Job satisfaction __ Disagreement with supervisor __ Insufficient Salary __ Discrimination __ Workload was too heavy __ Sexual harassment __ Discrimination __ Poor physical working conditions __ Other, specify _______________ Which of the following is not a valid concern about this question? Question 7 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own reasons. B) People may select more than two reasons. C) All of the responses are negative. People may be leaving to return to school, for a better job, partner is relocating, etc. D) The list of possible responses is long and people may find it tedious to read through all of the possible responses. E) These are all valid concerns about this question. Save Question 8 (1 point) Evaluate this question: "Do you oppose measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?" Question 8 options: A) The question is clearly worded. B) It would be better to offer answer choices like Yes, No, Maybe. C) The question wording is very confusing. What 'measures' are being discussed? What is meant by 'promoting'? D) It would be better to word the question in a positive way: 'Do you support measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?' Save Question 9 (1 point) A statewide professional organization conducted a survey of its members. The survey included two open-ended questions on the effectiveness of the association's activities. A review of the returned questionnaires suggest that most association members answered these two questions You have been asked to make an initial report on the survey findings. You do not have time to examine all of the 600 responses to the two open-ended questions. Suggest a strategy for including information from these two open-ended questions in your report. Question 9 options: A) Tally the responses to the two open-ended questions to the best of your ability during the time frame. B) Select the first 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. C) Select the last 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. D) Take a small random sample of the questionnaires and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. Save Question 10 (1 point) Which the following is not a step used in writing an effective survey instrument? Question 10 options: A) Create a model to guide development of the survey questions B) Determine if a survey is really necessary C) Pretest the survey items D) Pilot test the survey using the planned data collection method E) Never analyze the data from the pilot test since it may bias your approach to later analyses Save ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) It is generally advisable to place demographic questions such as gender, race/ethnicity, income, etc near the beginning of a survey to make sure that each respondent completes these items. Question 11 options: A) True B) False Save Question 12 (1 point) Loaded questions are worded so that the respondent cannot give an acceptable answer. Question 12 options: A) True B) False Save Question 13 (1 point) A biased question is worded so that it encourages respondents to give one answer over another, eliciting inaccurate information. Question 13 options: A) True B) False Save Question 14 (1 point) Operational validity is not affected by the number of questions on a survey. Question 14 options: A) True B) False Save Question 1 (1 point) Which of the following is a characteristic of behavior questions? Question 1 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents about things they do or have done C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of behavior questions. Save Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is not an characteristic of factual questions? Question 2 options: A) Elicit objective information from respondents B) Ask respondents what they think about a specific issue or event. C) Demographic questions D) Ask about something on which the researcher wants information E) These are all characteristics of factual questions. Save ________________________________________ Question 3 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Identify each type of question being asked on this survey. Question 3 options: 'Would you support higher taxes to fund the redevelopment of downtown?' Yes No 'Do you plan to vote in the next mayoral election?' Yes No 'When is the next mayoral election in Wind Valley?' This year, Next year, In two years 'Did you graduate from Wind Valley High School?' Yes No 'Do you think taxes are too high in Wind Valley?' Yes No 1. Opinion 2. Factual 3. Behavior 4. Knowledge Save ________________________________________ Question 4 (1 point) A town survey was developed in Wind Valley. The questions will be asked in a face-to-face interview. Match each item with the correct part of the survey. Question 4 options: 'Are you a homeowner residing in Wind Valley?' Yes No 'Would you support higher property taxes to improve the libary services?' 'How long have you owned a home in Wind Valley?' 10 years 'How often do you use the town's library?' Weekly, Monthly, Never Hi, I am Wendy Victor, city manager of Wind Valley. I am collecting information from homeowners of Wind Valley concerning our town's libary and the services it offers. Would you mind answering a few questions. This will only take a few minutes 1. Main Questions 2. Demographic Questions 3. First Question 4. Introduction Save ________________________________________ Question 5 (1 point) A community survey sent interviewers out into the community to interview residents about the presence of police in the community and incidence of crime. Some of the survey questions are shown below. Identify each question as open-ended or closed-ended. Question 5 options: Do you use public transportation? Yes No How long have you lived in this community? 10 years Identify at least two factors that you feel are most important to preventing crime in your neighborhood. If you attended college, what was your major? Have you been a victim of crime in your neighborhood? Yes No What is your household income? <$30,000; $30,000-$50,000, <$50,000 1. Closed-ended 2. Open-ended Save ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) A nursing home is surveying their residents about services available in the facilty. One of the survey questions appears below: How often do you use or participate in the following services or activities? a. The Beauty and Barber Shop __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never b. Crafts __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never c. Card and Game Night __ Often __ Occasionally __ Rarely __ Never Which of the following is a valid concern about these questions? Question 6 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own answers. B) There are two many services listed. C) There should be fewer choices. It would be best to use 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'never.' D) The wording is unclear. The terms 'often,' 'occasionally,' and 'rarely' are not well-defined. Save Question 7 (1 point) The city of Boomtown asks each employee who ends their employment voluntarily to answer this question: What is the main reason you are resigning your position? Select at most two reasons: __ Lack of Job satisfaction __ Disagreement with supervisor __ Insufficient Salary __ Discrimination __ Workload was too heavy __ Sexual harassment __ Discrimination __ Poor physical working conditions __ Other, specify _______________ Which of the following is not a valid concern about this question? Question 7 options: A) It might be better to use an open-ended question and allow people to provide their own reasons. B) People may select more than two reasons. C) All of the responses are negative. People may be leaving to return to school, for a better job, partner is relocating, etc. D) The list of possible responses is long and people may find it tedious to read through all of the possible responses. E) These are all valid concerns about this question. Save Question 8 (1 point) Evaluate this question: "Do you oppose measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?" Question 8 options: A) The question is clearly worded. B) It would be better to offer answer choices like Yes, No, Maybe. C) The question wording is very confusing. What 'measures' are being discussed? What is meant by 'promoting'? D) It would be better to word the question in a positive way: 'Do you support measures promoting the abolition of the death penalty?' Save Question 9 (1 point) A statewide professional organization conducted a survey of its members. The survey included two open-ended questions on the effectiveness of the association's activities. A review of the returned questionnaires suggest that most association members answered these two questions You have been asked to make an initial report on the survey findings. You do not have time to examine all of the 600 responses to the two open-ended questions. Suggest a strategy for including information from these two open-ended questions in your report. Question 9 options: A) Tally the responses to the two open-ended questions to the best of your ability during the time frame. B) Select the first 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. C) Select the last 10 questionnaires returned and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. D) Take a small random sample of the questionnaires and examine the responses to the two open-ended questions. Save Question 10 (1 point) Which the following is not a step used in writing an effective survey instrument? Question 10 options: A) Create a model to guide development of the survey questions B) Determine if a survey is really necessary C) Pretest the survey items D) Pilot test the survey using the planned data collection method E) Never analyze the data from the pilot test since it may bias your approach to later analyses Save ________________________________________ Question 11 (1 point) It is generally advisable to place demographic questions such as gender, race/ethnicity, income, etc near the beginning of a survey to make sure that each respondent completes these items. Question 11 options: A) True B) False Save Question 12 (1 point) Loaded questions are worded so that the respondent cannot give an acceptable answer. Question 12 options: A) True B) False Save Question 13 (1 point) A biased question is worded so that it encourages respondents to give one answer over another, eliciting inaccurate information. Question 13 options: A) True B) False Save Question 14 (1 point) Operational validity is not affected by the number of questions on a survey. Question 14 options: A) True B) False Save Click here to get this question answered.

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Information Needs

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Information Needs for the AIS Pin It In 1967, Russell Ackoff presented a classical analysis of misinformation in management ((COPPIED AT THE BOTTOM)) Now, you need to fast-forward to the present. After reading the case, craft your own version of misinformation in management by developing five (5) key incorrect assumptions that management makes about its accounting information systems. For this assignment, research the Internet for information related to improper assumptions concerning accounting information systems. Write a five to seven (5-7) page paper in which you: 1. Based on your research, assess how corporate leaders may make improper assumptions related to accounting information systems and the related information. Indicate the most negative potential impacts on business operations related to these assumptions. Provide support for your rationale. 2. Suggest three to four (3-4) ways in which organizational performance may be improved when information is properly managed within a business system. Provide support for your rationale. 3. Evaluate the level of system security (i.e., high, medium, low) needed to ensure information integrity within automated business systems. Provide support for your evaluation. 4. Use at least three (3) quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar Websites do not qualify as quality resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: · Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. 1 REQUIRED: Read the five assumptions, contentions, and Ackoff’s explanation. For each of the five, decide if you agree or disagree with Ackoff’s contentions. Defend your stand by preparing a report to explain your beliefs. Be prepared to defend your beliefs in class. ASSUMPTION 1: MANAGEMENT NEEDS MORE INFORMATION Assumption 1. Most management information systems (MISs) are designed based on the assumption that the critical deficiency under which most managers operate is the lack of relevant information. Contention 1. I do not deny that most managers lack a good deal of information that they should have, but I do deny that this is the most important informational deficiency from which they suffer. It seems to me that they suffer more from an overabundance of irrelevant information. This is not a play on words. The consequences of changing the emphasis of an MIS from supplying relevant information to eliminating irrelevant information is considerable. If one is preoccupied with supplying relevant information, attention is almost exclusively given to the generation, storage, and retrieval of information; hence, emphasis is placed on constructing data banks, coding, indexing, updating files, using access languages, and so on. The ideal that has emerged from this orientation is an infinite pool of data into which managers can reach to pull out any information they want. If, however, one sees the manager’s information problem primarily, but not exclusively, as one that arises out of an overabundance of irrelevant information, most of which was not asked for, then the two most important functions of an information system become filtration (or evaluation) and condensation. The literature on the MIS seldom refers to these functions, let alone considers how to carry them out. My experience indicates that most managers receive much more data (if not information) than they can possibly absorb even if they spend all of their time trying to do so. Hence they already suffer from an information overload. They must spend a great deal of time separating the relevant documents. For example, I have found that I receive an average of 43 hours of unsolicited reading material each week. The solicited material is usually half again this amount. I have seen a daily stock status report that consists of approximately 600 pages of computer printout. The report is circulated daily across managers’ desks. I’ve also seen requests for major capital expenditures that come in book size, several of which are distributed to managers each week. It is not uncommon for many managers to receive an average of one journal a day or more. One could go on and on. Unless the information overload to which managers are subjected is reduced, any additional information made available by an MIS cannot be expected to be used effectively. Even relevant documents have too much redundancy. Most documents can be considerably condensed without loss of content. My point here is best made, perhaps, by describing This case is adapted from a classic article entitled “Management Misinformation Systems.” It was written by Russell L. Ackoff and appeared in Management Sciences. In the article, Ackoff identified five common assumptions about information systems and then explained why he disagreed with them. Case 1-2 Ackoff’s Management Misinformation Systems 2 CASE 1-2 briefly an experiment that a few of my colleagues and I conducted on the operations research (OR) literature several years ago. By using a panel of well-known experts, we identified four OR articles that all members of the panel considered to be “above average” and four articles that were considered to be “below average.” The authors of the eight articles were asked to prepare “objective” examinations (duration 30 minutes) plus answers for graduate students who were to be assigned the articles for reading. (The authors were not informed about the experiment.) Then several experienced writers were asked to reduce each article to two-thirds and one-third of its original length only by eliminating words. They also prepared a brief abstract of each article. Those who did the condensing did not see the examinations to be given to the students. A group of graduate students who had not previously read the articles was then selected. Each one was given four articles randomly selected, each of which was in one of its four versions: 100 percent, 67 percent, 33 percent, or abstract. Each version of each article was read by two students. All were given the same examinations. The average scores on the examinations were compared. For the above-average articles there was no significant difference between average test scores for the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant decrease in average test scores for those who had read only the abstract. For the below-average articles there was no difference in average test scores among those who had read the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant increase in average test scores of those who had read only the abstract. The sample used was obviously too small for general conclusions, but the results strongly indicate the extent to which even good writing can be condensed without loss of information. I refrain from drawing the obvious conclusions about bad writing. It seems clear that condensation as well as filtration, performed mechanically or otherwise, should be an essential part of an MIS, and that such a system should be capable of handling much, if not all, of the unsolicited as well as solicited information that a manager receives. ASSUMPTION 2: MANAGERS NEED THE INFORMATION THEY WANT Assumption 2. Most MIS designers “determine” what information is needed by asking managers what information they would like to have. This is based on the assumption that managers know what information they need and want. Contention 2. For a manager to know what information he needs, he must be aware of each type of decision he should (as well as does) make and he must have an adequate model of each. These conditions are seldom satisfied. Most managers have some conception of at least some of the types of decisions they must make. Their conceptions, however, are likely to be deficient in a very critical way, a way that follows from an important principle of scientific economy: The less we understand a phenomenon, the more variables we require to explain it. Hence managers who do not understand the phenomena they control play it “safe” and, with respect to information, want “everything.” The MIS designer, who has even less understanding of the relevant phenomena than the manager, tries to provide even more than everything. She thereby increases what is already an overload of irrelevant information. For example, market researchers in a major oil company once asked their marketing managers what variables they thought were relevant in estimating the sales volume of future service stations. Almost 70 variables were identified. The market researchers then added about half again this many variables and performed a large multiple linear regression analysis of sales of existing stations against these variables and found about 35 to be statistically significant. A forecasting equation was based on this analysis. An OR team subsequently constructed a model based on only one of these variables, traffic flow, CASE 1-2 3 which predicted sales better than the 35-variable regression equation. The team went on to explain sales at service stations in terms of the customers’ perception of the amount of time lost by stopping for service. The relevance of all but a few of the variables used by the market researchers could be explained by their effect on such a perception. The moral is simple: One cannot specify what information is required for decision making until an explanatory model of the decision process and the system involved has been constructed and tested. Information systems are subsystems of control systems. They cannot be designed adequately without taking control into account. Furthermore, whatever else regression analyses can yield, they cannot yield understanding and explanation of phenomena. They describe and, at best, predict. ASSUMPTION 3: GIVING MANAGERS THE INFORMATION THEY NEED IMPROVES THEIR DECISION MAKING Assumption 3. It is frequently assumed that if managers are provided with the information they need, they will then have no problem in using it effectively. Contention 3. Operations research (an academic subject area dealing with the application of mathematical models and techniques to business decisions) stands to the contrary. Give most managers an initial tableau of a typical “real” mathematical programming, sequencing, or network problem and see how close they come to an optimal solution. If their experience and judgment have any value, they may not do badly, but they will seldom do very well. In most management problems there are too many possibilities to expect experience, judgment, or intuition to provide good guesses, even with perfect information. Furthermore, when several probabilities are involved in a problem, the unguided mind of even a manager has difficulty in aggregating them in a valid way. We all know many simple problems in probability in which untutored intuition usually does very badly (e.g., What are the correct odds that 2 of 25 people selected at random will have their birthdays on the same day of the year?). For example, very few of the results obtained by queuing theory, when arrivals and service are probabilistic, are obvious to managers; nor are the results of risk analysis where the managers’ own subjective estimates of probabilities are used. The moral: It is necessary to determine how well managers can use needed information. When, because of the complexity of the decision process, they cannot use it well, they should be provided with either decision rules or performance feedback so that they can identify and learn from their mistakes. ASSUMPTION 4: MORE COMMUNICATION MEANS BETTER PERFORMANCE Assumption 4. The characteristic of most MISs is that they provide managers with better current information about what other managers and their departments are doing. Underlying this provision is the belief that better interdepartmental communication enables managers to coordinate their decisions more effectively and hence improves the organization’s overall performance. Contention 4. Not only is this not necessarily so, but it seldom is so. One would hardly expect two competing companies to become more cooperative because the information each acquires about the other is improved. For example, consider the following very much simplified version of a situation I once ran into. The simplification of the case does not affect any of its essential characteristics. A department store has two “line” operations: buying and selling. Each function is performed by a separate department. The Purchasing Department primarily controls one variable: how much of each item is bought. The Merchandising Department controls the price at which it is sold. Typically, the measure of performance applied to the Purchasing Department was the turnover rate of inventory. The measure applied to the Merchandising Department was gross sales; this department sought to maximize the number of items sold times their price. Now by examining a single item, let us consider what happens in this system. The merchandising manager, using his knowledge of competition and consumption, set a price that he judged would maximize gross sales. In doing so, he utilized price-demand curves for each type of item. For each price the curves show the expected sales and values on an upper and lower confidence band as well (see Figure 1). When instructing the Purchasing Department about how many items to make available, the merchandising manager quite naturally used the value on the upper confidence curve. This minimized the chances of his running short, which, if it occurred, would hurt his performance. It also maximized the chances of being overstocked, but this was not his concern, only the purchasing manager’s. Say, therefore, that the merchandising manager initially selected price P1 and requested that amount Q1 be made available by the Purchasing Department. In this company the purchasing manager also had access to the price-demand curves. She knew that the merchandising manager always ordered optimistically. Therefore, using the same curve, she read over from Q1 to the upper limit and down to the expected value, from which she obtained Q2, the quantity she actually intended to make available. She did not intend to pay for the merchandising manager’s optimism. If merchandising ran out of stock, it was not her worry. Now the merchandising manager was informed about what the purchasing manager had done, so he adjusted his price to P2. The purchasing manager in turn was told that the merchandising manager had made this readjustment, so she planned to make only Q3 available. If this process (made possible only by perfect communication between departments) had been allowed to continue, nothing would have been bought and nothing would have been sold. This outcome was avoided by prohibiting communication between the two departments and forcing each to guess what the other was doing. I have obviously caricatured the situation in order to make the point clear: When organizational units have inappropriate measures of performance that put them in conflict with each other, as is often the case, communication between them may hurt organizational performance, not help it. Organizational structure and performance measurement must be taken into account before opening the floodgates and permitting the free flow of information between parts of the organization. ASSUMPTION 5: MANAGERS NEED ONLY TO UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE AN INFORMATION SYSTEM Assumption 5. A manager does not have to understand how an information system works, only how to use it. Contention 5. Managers must understand their MIS or they are handicapped and cannot properly operate and control their company. Most MIS designers seek to make their systems as innocuous and unobtrusive as possible to managers, lest they become frightened. The designers try to provide managers with very easy 4 CASE 1-2 Optimistic Expected Pessimistic P1 P2 P3 Q1 Q2 Q3Demand Price Figure 1 access to the system and assure them that they need to know nothing more about it. The designers usually succeed in keeping managers ignorant in this regard. This leaves managers unable to evaluate the MIS as a whole. It often makes them afraid to even try to do so, lest they display their ignorance publicly. In failing to evaluate their MIS, managers delegate much of the control of the organization to the system’s designers and operators—who may have many virtues, but managerial competence is seldom among them. Let me cite a case in point. A chairman of the board of a midsize company asked for help on the following problem. One of his larger (decentralized) divisions had installed a computerized production inventory control and manufacturing manager information system about a year earlier. It had acquired about $2 million worth of equipment to do so. The board chairman had just received a request from the division for permission to replace the original equipment with newly announced equipment that would cost several times the original amount. An extensive “justification” for so doing was provided with the request. The chairman wanted to know whether the request was justified. He admitted to complete incompetence in this connection. A meeting was arranged at the division, at which I was subjected to an extended and detailed briefing. The system was large but relatively simple. At the heart of it was a reorder point for each item and a maximum allowable stock level. Reorder quantities took lead time as well as the allowable maximum into account. The computer kept track of stock, ordered items when required, and generated numerous reports on both the state of the system it controlled and its own “actions.” When the briefing was over, I was asked if I had any questions. I did. First I asked if, when the system had been installed, there had been many parts whose stock level exceeded the maximum amount possible under the new system. I was told there were many. I asked for a list of about 30 and for some graph paper. Both were provided. With the help of the system designer and volumes of old daily reports I began to plot the stock level of the first listed item over time. When this item reached the maximum “allowable” stock level, it had been reordered. The system designer was surprised and said that by sheer “luck” I had found one of the few errors made by the system. Continued plotting showed that because of repeated premature reordering the item had never gone much below the maximum stock level. Clearly, the program was confusing the maximum allowable stock level and the reorder point. This turned out to be the case in more than half of the items on the list. Next I asked if they had many paired parts, ones that were only used with each other, for example, matched nuts and bolts. They had many. A list was produced and we began checking the previous day’s withdrawals. For more than half of the pairs the differences in the numbers recorded as withdrawn were very large. No explanation was provided. Before the day was out it was possible to show by some quick and dirty calculations that the new computerized system was costing the company almost $150,000 per month more than the hand system that it had replaced, most of this in excess inventories. The recommendation was that the system be redesigned as quickly as possible and that the new equipment not be authorized for the time being. The questions asked of the system had been obvious and simple ones. Managers should have been able to ask them, but—and this is the point—they felt themselves incompetent to do so. They would not have allowed a hand-operated system to get so far out of their control. No MIS should ever be installed unless the managers for whom it is intended are trained to evaluate and hence control it rather than be controlled by it. Source: Reprinted by permission of Russell L. Ackoff, “Management Misinformation Systems,” Management Sciences 14, no. 4 (December 1967). The Institute of Management Sciences, 290 Westminster Street, Providence, R.I. 02903. CASE 1-2 5Information Needs for the AIS Pin It In 1967, Russell Ackoff presented a classical analysis of misinformation in management ((COPPIED AT THE BOTTOM)) Now, you need to fast-forward to the present. After reading the case, craft your own version of misinformation in management by developing five (5) key incorrect assumptions that management makes about its accounting information systems. For this assignment, research the Internet for information related to improper assumptions concerning accounting information systems. Write a five to seven (5-7) page paper in which you: 1. Based on your research, assess how corporate leaders may make improper assumptions related to accounting information systems and the related information. Indicate the most negative potential impacts on business operations related to these assumptions. Provide support for your rationale. 2. Suggest three to four (3-4) ways in which organizational performance may be improved when information is properly managed within a business system. Provide support for your rationale. 3. Evaluate the level of system security (i.e., high, medium, low) needed to ensure information integrity within automated business systems. Provide support for your evaluation. 4. Use at least three (3) quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar Websites do not qualify as quality resources. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: · Be typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides; citations and references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. 1 REQUIRED: Read the five assumptions, contentions, and Ackoff’s explanation. For each of the five, decide if you agree or disagree with Ackoff’s contentions. Defend your stand by preparing a report to explain your beliefs. Be prepared to defend your beliefs in class. ASSUMPTION 1: MANAGEMENT NEEDS MORE INFORMATION Assumption 1. Most management information systems (MISs) are designed based on the assumption that the critical deficiency under which most managers operate is the lack of relevant information. Contention 1. I do not deny that most managers lack a good deal of information that they should have, but I do deny that this is the most important informational deficiency from which they suffer. It seems to me that they suffer more from an overabundance of irrelevant information. This is not a play on words. The consequences of changing the emphasis of an MIS from supplying relevant information to eliminating irrelevant information is considerable. If one is preoccupied with supplying relevant information, attention is almost exclusively given to the generation, storage, and retrieval of information; hence, emphasis is placed on constructing data banks, coding, indexing, updating files, using access languages, and so on. The ideal that has emerged from this orientation is an infinite pool of data into which managers can reach to pull out any information they want. If, however, one sees the manager’s information problem primarily, but not exclusively, as one that arises out of an overabundance of irrelevant information, most of which was not asked for, then the two most important functions of an information system become filtration (or evaluation) and condensation. The literature on the MIS seldom refers to these functions, let alone considers how to carry them out. My experience indicates that most managers receive much more data (if not information) than they can possibly absorb even if they spend all of their time trying to do so. Hence they already suffer from an information overload. They must spend a great deal of time separating the relevant documents. For example, I have found that I receive an average of 43 hours of unsolicited reading material each week. The solicited material is usually half again this amount. I have seen a daily stock status report that consists of approximately 600 pages of computer printout. The report is circulated daily across managers’ desks. I’ve also seen requests for major capital expenditures that come in book size, several of which are distributed to managers each week. It is not uncommon for many managers to receive an average of one journal a day or more. One could go on and on. Unless the information overload to which managers are subjected is reduced, any additional information made available by an MIS cannot be expected to be used effectively. Even relevant documents have too much redundancy. Most documents can be considerably condensed without loss of content. My point here is best made, perhaps, by describing This case is adapted from a classic article entitled “Management Misinformation Systems.” It was written by Russell L. Ackoff and appeared in Management Sciences. In the article, Ackoff identified five common assumptions about information systems and then explained why he disagreed with them. Case 1-2 Ackoff’s Management Misinformation Systems 2 CASE 1-2 briefly an experiment that a few of my colleagues and I conducted on the operations research (OR) literature several years ago. By using a panel of well-known experts, we identified four OR articles that all members of the panel considered to be “above average” and four articles that were considered to be “below average.” The authors of the eight articles were asked to prepare “objective” examinations (duration 30 minutes) plus answers for graduate students who were to be assigned the articles for reading. (The authors were not informed about the experiment.) Then several experienced writers were asked to reduce each article to two-thirds and one-third of its original length only by eliminating words. They also prepared a brief abstract of each article. Those who did the condensing did not see the examinations to be given to the students. A group of graduate students who had not previously read the articles was then selected. Each one was given four articles randomly selected, each of which was in one of its four versions: 100 percent, 67 percent, 33 percent, or abstract. Each version of each article was read by two students. All were given the same examinations. The average scores on the examinations were compared. For the above-average articles there was no significant difference between average test scores for the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant decrease in average test scores for those who had read only the abstract. For the below-average articles there was no difference in average test scores among those who had read the 100 percent, 67 percent, and 33 percent versions, but there was a significant increase in average test scores of those who had read only the abstract. The sample used was obviously too small for general conclusions, but the results strongly indicate the extent to which even good writing can be condensed without loss of information. I refrain from drawing the obvious conclusions about bad writing. It seems clear that condensation as well as filtration, performed mechanically or otherwise, should be an essential part of an MIS, and that such a system should be capable of handling much, if not all, of the unsolicited as well as solicited information that a manager receives. ASSUMPTION 2: MANAGERS NEED THE INFORMATION THEY WANT Assumption 2. Most MIS designers “determine” what information is needed by asking managers what information they would like to have. This is based on the assumption that managers know what information they need and want. Contention 2. For a manager to know what information he needs, he must be aware of each type of decision he should (as well as does) make and he must have an adequate model of each. These conditions are seldom satisfied. Most managers have some conception of at least some of the types of decisions they must make. Their conceptions, however, are likely to be deficient in a very critical way, a way that follows from an important principle of scientific economy: The less we understand a phenomenon, the more variables we require to explain it. Hence managers who do not understand the phenomena they control play it “safe” and, with respect to information, want “everything.” The MIS designer, who has even less understanding of the relevant phenomena than the manager, tries to provide even more than everything. She thereby increases what is already an overload of irrelevant information. For example, market researchers in a major oil company once asked their marketing managers what variables they thought were relevant in estimating the sales volume of future service stations. Almost 70 variables were identified. The market researchers then added about half again this many variables and performed a large multiple linear regression analysis of sales of existing stations against these variables and found about 35 to be statistically significant. A forecasting equation was based on this analysis. An OR team subsequently constructed a model based on only one of these variables, traffic flow, CASE 1-2 3 which predicted sales better than the 35-variable regression equation. The team went on to explain sales at service stations in terms of the customers’ perception of the amount of time lost by stopping for service. The relevance of all but a few of the variables used by the market researchers could be explained by their effect on such a perception. The moral is simple: One cannot specify what information is required for decision making until an explanatory model of the decision process and the system involved has been constructed and tested. Information systems are subsystems of control systems. They cannot be designed adequately without taking control into account. Furthermore, whatever else regression analyses can yield, they cannot yield understanding and explanation of phenomena. They describe and, at best, predict. ASSUMPTION 3: GIVING MANAGERS THE INFORMATION THEY NEED IMPROVES THEIR DECISION MAKING Assumption 3. It is frequently assumed that if managers are provided with the information they need, they will then have no problem in using it effectively. Contention 3. Operations research (an academic subject area dealing with the application of mathematical models and techniques to business decisions) stands to the contrary. Give most managers an initial tableau of a typical “real” mathematical programming, sequencing, or network problem and see how close they come to an optimal solution. If their experience and judgment have any value, they may not do badly, but they will seldom do very well. In most management problems there are too many possibilities to expect experience, judgment, or intuition to provide good guesses, even with perfect information. Furthermore, when several probabilities are involved in a problem, the unguided mind of even a manager has difficulty in aggregating them in a valid way. We all know many simple problems in probability in which untutored intuition usually does very badly (e.g., What are the correct odds that 2 of 25 people selected at random will have their birthdays on the same day of the year?). For example, very few of the results obtained by queuing theory, when arrivals and service are probabilistic, are obvious to managers; nor are the results of risk analysis where the managers’ own subjective estimates of probabilities are used. The moral: It is necessary to determine how well managers can use needed information. When, because of the complexity of the decision process, they cannot use it well, they should be provided with either decision rules or performance feedback so that they can identify and learn from their mistakes. ASSUMPTION 4: MORE COMMUNICATION MEANS BETTER PERFORMANCE Assumption 4. The characteristic of most MISs is that they provide managers with better current information about what other managers and their departments are doing. Underlying this provision is the belief that better interdepartmental communication enables managers to coordinate their decisions more effectively and hence improves the organization’s overall performance. Contention 4. Not only is this not necessarily so, but it seldom is so. One would hardly expect two competing companies to become more cooperative because the information each acquires about the other is improved. For example, consider the following very much simplified version of a situation I once ran into. The simplification of the case does not affect any of its essential characteristics. A department store has two “line” operations: buying and selling. Each function is performed by a separate department. The Purchasing Department primarily controls one variable: how much of each item is bought. The Merchandising Department controls the price at which it is sold. Typically, the measure of performance applied to the Purchasing Department was the turnover rate of inventory. The measure applied to the Merchandising Department was gross sales; this department sought to maximize the number of items sold times their price. Now by examining a single item, let us consider what happens in this system. The merchandising manager, using his knowledge of competition and consumption, set a price that he judged would maximize gross sales. In doing so, he utilized price-demand curves for each type of item. For each price the curves show the expected sales and values on an upper and lower confidence band as well (see Figure 1). When instructing the Purchasing Department about how many items to make available, the merchandising manager quite naturally used the value on the upper confidence curve. This minimized the chances of his running short, which, if it occurred, would hurt his performance. It also maximized the chances of being overstocked, but this was not his concern, only the purchasing manager’s. Say, therefore, that the merchandising manager initially selected price P1 and requested that amount Q1 be made available by the Purchasing Department. In this company the purchasing manager also had access to the price-demand curves. She knew that the merchandising manager always ordered optimistically. Therefore, using the same curve, she read over from Q1 to the upper limit and down to the expected value, from which she obtained Q2, the quantity she actually intended to make available. She did not intend to pay for the merchandising manager’s optimism. If merchandising ran out of stock, it was not her worry. Now the merchandising manager was informed about what the purchasing manager had done, so he adjusted his price to P2. The purchasing manager in turn was told that the merchandising manager had made this readjustment, so she planned to make only Q3 available. If this process (made possible only by perfect communication between departments) had been allowed to continue, nothing would have been bought and nothing would have been sold. This outcome was avoided by prohibiting communication between the two departments and forcing each to guess what the other was doing. I have obviously caricatured the situation in order to make the point clear: When organizational units have inappropriate measures of performance that put them in conflict with each other, as is often the case, communication between them may hurt organizational performance, not help it. Organizational structure and performance measurement must be taken into account before opening the floodgates and permitting the free flow of information between parts of the organization. ASSUMPTION 5: MANAGERS NEED ONLY TO UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE AN INFORMATION SYSTEM Assumption 5. A manager does not have to understand how an information system works, only how to use it. Contention 5. Managers must understand their MIS or they are handicapped and cannot properly operate and control their company. Most MIS designers seek to make their systems as innocuous and unobtrusive as possible to managers, lest they become frightened. The designers try to provide managers with very easy 4 CASE 1-2 Optimistic Expected Pessimistic P1 P2 P3 Q1 Q2 Q3Demand Price Figure 1 access to the system and assure them that they need to know nothing more about it. The designers usually succeed in keeping managers ignorant in this regard. This leaves managers unable to evaluate the MIS as a whole. It often makes them afraid to even try to do so, lest they display their ignorance publicly. In failing to evaluate their MIS, managers delegate much of the control of the organization to the system’s designers and operators—who may have many virtues, but managerial competence is seldom among them. Let me cite a case in point. A chairman of the board of a midsize company asked for help on the following problem. One of his larger (decentralized) divisions had installed a computerized production inventory control and manufacturing manager information system about a year earlier. It had acquired about $2 million worth of equipment to do so. The board chairman had just received a request from the division for permission to replace the original equipment with newly announced equipment that would cost several times the original amount. An extensive “justification” for so doing was provided with the request. The chairman wanted to know whether the request was justified. He admitted to complete incompetence in this connection. A meeting was arranged at the division, at which I was subjected to an extended and detailed briefing. The system was large but relatively simple. At the heart of it was a reorder point for each item and a maximum allowable stock level. Reorder quantities took lead time as well as the allowable maximum into account. The computer kept track of stock, ordered items when required, and generated numerous reports on both the state of the system it controlled and its own “actions.” When the briefing was over, I was asked if I had any questions. I did. First I asked if, when the system had been installed, there had been many parts whose stock level exceeded the maximum amount possible under the new system. I was told there were many. I asked for a list of about 30 and for some graph paper. Both were provided. With the help of the system designer and volumes of old daily reports I began to plot the stock level of the first listed item over time. When this item reached the maximum “allowable” stock level, it had been reordered. The system designer was surprised and said that by sheer “luck” I had found one of the few errors made by the system. Continued plotting showed that because of repeated premature reordering the item had never gone much below the maximum stock level. Clearly, the program was confusing the maximum allowable stock level and the reorder point. This turned out to be the case in more than half of the items on the list. Next I asked if they had many paired parts, ones that were only used with each other, for example, matched nuts and bolts. They had many. A list was produced and we began checking the previous day’s withdrawals. For more than half of the pairs the differences in the numbers recorded as withdrawn were very large. No explanation was provided. Before the day was out it was possible to show by some quick and dirty calculations that the new computerized system was costing the company almost $150,000 per month more than the hand system that it had replaced, most of this in excess inventories. The recommendation was that the system be redesigned as quickly as possible and that the new equipment not be authorized for the time being. The questions asked of the system had been obvious and simple ones. Managers should have been able to ask them, but—and this is the point—they felt themselves incompetent to do so. They would not have allowed a hand-operated system to get so far out of their control. No MIS should ever be installed unless the managers for whom it is intended are trained to evaluate and hence control it rather than be controlled by it. Source: Reprinted by permission of Russell L. Ackoff, “Management Misinformation Systems,” Management Sciences 14, no. 4 (December 1967). The Institute of Management Sciences, 290 Westminster Street, Providence, R.I. 02903. CASE 1-2 5Click here to get this question answered.

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Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment for the lack of housing and support services for people with mental illness Pin It Rural Needs Assessment Due Today by 9:59pm Points 40 Submitting a file upload (Turnitin enabled) Rural Needs Assessment: In our professional social work practice we may encounter information that would suggest a community wide problem or concern. We can react to anecdotal data or personal experiences, before we critically analyze a problem, which may create a perception that a problem has wider reaching effects on a community than it really does. To effectively address rural social concerns it is important to accurately assess problems, social issues or concerns to assure that, often limited, resources are utilized effectively and efficiently. In this paper you are to identify a social issue that is relevant to rural social work and use a variety of professional sources including the catchment group, key informants (community leaders, service providers) and the larger community to assess the unmet service provision and service access needs related to the issue. You will use the needs assessment data you collect to inform your Developing Rural Services paper. You will find some specific information about needs assessments and a case example in Chapter 11 of Ginsberg. Use the following outline to organize your paper which should be about 6 pages with at least 5 professional references (this means academic journal articles and is in addition to the stakeholders you will speak with) and use correct APA style. Use the rubric criteria for headings in your paper to keep yourself focused. 1. Identify a local social concern/issue/problem. Describe why you believe this issue is important and how it has led to unmet services or access to services. What is the relevance to the profession of social work? 2. Plan your needs assessment. a. Identify Key Stakeholders – who will you collect data from? b. Determine the purpose of the Needs Assessment c. Identify the underlying theories/assumptions d. Determine required resources to complete the needs assessment e. Know the community – provide statistical data f. Choose the type of assessment 3. Conduct a basic needs assessment and share your findings. Do the people affected by the problem view the problem in the same way that you view the problem (See your answer to Question 1)? How does this compare to the viewpoint of key informants and the community at large? What needs are not currently being met in underserved rural areas according to the data you have collected? Please Note: In order to complete this assignment you will have to actually collect data from real people. So you should choose a topic and area that is accessible for you to complete data Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment for the lack of housing and support services for people with mental illness Pin It Rural Needs Assessment Due Today by 9:59pm Points 40 Submitting a file upload (Turnitin enabled) Rural Needs Assessment: In our professional social work practice we may encounter information that would suggest a community wide problem or concern. We can react to anecdotal data or personal experiences, before we critically analyze a problem, which may create a perception that a problem has wider reaching effects on a community than it really does. To effectively address rural social concerns it is important to accurately assess problems, social issues or concerns to assure that, often limited, resources are utilized effectively and efficiently. In this paper you are to identify a social issue that is relevant to rural social work and use a variety of professional sources including the catchment group, key informants (community leaders, service providers) and the larger community to assess the unmet service provision and service access needs related to the issue. You will use the needs assessment data you collect to inform your Developing Rural Services paper. You will find some specific information about needs assessments and a case example in Chapter 11 of Ginsberg. Use the following outline to organize your paper which should be about 6 pages with at least 5 professional references (this means academic journal articles and is in addition to the stakeholders you will speak with) and use correct APA style. Use the rubric criteria for headings in your paper to keep yourself focused. 1. Identify a local social concern/issue/problem. Describe why you believe this issue is important and how it has led to unmet services or access to services. What is the relevance to the profession of social work? 2. Plan your needs assessment. a. Identify Key Stakeholders – who will you collect data from? b. Determine the purpose of the Needs Assessment c. Identify the underlying theories/assumptions d. Determine required resources to complete the needs assessment e. Know the community – provide statistical data f. Choose the type of assessment 3. Conduct a basic needs assessment and share your findings. Do the people affected by the problem view the problem in the same way that you view the problem (See your answer to Question 1)? How does this compare to the viewpoint of key informants and the community at large? What needs are not currently being met in underserved rural areas according to the data you have collected? Please Note: In order to complete this assignment you will have to actually collect data from real people. So you should choose a topic and area that is accessible for you to complete data Click here to get this question answered.

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Environmental Policy and the Poor

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Week 5 - Assignment 1 Environmental Policy and the Poor The goals of environmental policy and our concern for the poor inevitably conflict. The burden of any attempt to improve the environment necessarily falls disproportionately on the poor. Prepare a two- to three-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) on the following: First, describe at least two policy examples that generate or have generated disproportionate impacts. Next, explain how a current policy or theoretical policy (of your design) mitigates such disproportionate impacts. Third, evaluate the effects of these policies, and describe how they function – be sure to use specific examples from the market to support your evaluation. Format your paper according to APA style guidelines as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center and use at least three scholarly sources in addition to the textbook.Week 5 - Assignment 1 Environmental Policy and the Poor The goals of environmental policy and our concern for the poor inevitably conflict. The burden of any attempt to improve the environment necessarily falls disproportionately on the poor. Prepare a two- to three-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) on the following: First, describe at least two policy examples that generate or have generated disproportionate impacts. Next, explain how a current policy or theoretical policy (of your design) mitigates such disproportionate impacts. Third, evaluate the effects of these policies, and describe how they function – be sure to use specific examples from the market to support your evaluation. Format your paper according to APA style guidelines as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center and use at least three scholarly sources in addition to the textbook.Week 5 - Assignment 1 Environmental Policy and the Poor The goals of environmental policy and our concern for the poor inevitably conflict. The burden of any attempt to improve the environment necessarily falls disproportionately on the poor. Prepare a two- to three-page paper (not including the title and reference pages) on the following: First, describe at least two policy examples that generate or have generated disproportionate impacts. Next, explain how a current policy or theoretical policy (of your design) mitigates such disproportionate impacts. Third, evaluate the effects of these policies, and describe how they function – be sure to use specific examples from the market to support your evaluation. Format your paper according to APA style guidelines as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center and use at least three scholarly sources in addition to the textbook.Click here to get this question answered.

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Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment for the lack of housing and support services for people with mental illness Pin It Rural Needs Assessment Due Today by 9:59pm Points 40 Submitting a file upload (Turnitin enabled) Rural Needs Assessment: In our professional social work practice we may encounter information that would suggest a community wide problem or concern. We can react to anecdotal data or personal experiences, before we critically analyze a problem, which may create a perception that a problem has wider reaching effects on a community than it really does. To effectively address rural social concerns it is important to accurately assess problems, social issues or concerns to assure that, often limited, resources are utilized effectively and efficiently. In this paper you are to identify a social issue that is relevant to rural social work and use a variety of professional sources including the catchment group, key informants (community leaders, service providers) and the larger community to assess the unmet service provision and service access needs related to the issue. You will use the needs assessment data you collect to inform your Developing Rural Services paper. You will find some specific information about needs assessments and a case example in Chapter 11 of Ginsberg. Use the following outline to organize your paper which should be about 6 pages with at least 5 professional references (this means academic journal articles and is in addition to the stakeholders you will speak with) and use correct APA style. Use the rubric criteria for headings in your paper to keep yourself focused. 1. Identify a local social concern/issue/problem. Describe why you believe this issue is important and how it has led to unmet services or access to services. What is the relevance to the profession of social work? 2. Plan your needs assessment. a. Identify Key Stakeholders – who will you collect data from? b. Determine the purpose of the Needs Assessment c. Identify the underlying theories/assumptions d. Determine required resources to complete the needs assessment e. Know the community – provide statistical data f. Choose the type of assessment 3. Conduct a basic needs assessment and share your findings. Do the people affected by the problem view the problem in the same way that you view the problem (See your answer to Question 1)? How does this compare to the viewpoint of key informants and the community at large? What needs are not currently being met in underserved rural areas according to the data you have collected? Please Note: In order to complete this assignment you will have to actually collect data from real people. So you should choose a topic and area that is accessible for you to complete data Can Anyone complete a rural needs assessment for the lack of housing and support services for people with mental illness Pin It Rural Needs Assessment Due Today by 9:59pm Points 40 Submitting a file upload (Turnitin enabled) Rural Needs Assessment: In our professional social work practice we may encounter information that would suggest a community wide problem or concern. We can react to anecdotal data or personal experiences, before we critically analyze a problem, which may create a perception that a problem has wider reaching effects on a community than it really does. To effectively address rural social concerns it is important to accurately assess problems, social issues or concerns to assure that, often limited, resources are utilized effectively and efficiently. In this paper you are to identify a social issue that is relevant to rural social work and use a variety of professional sources including the catchment group, key informants (community leaders, service providers) and the larger community to assess the unmet service provision and service access needs related to the issue. You will use the needs assessment data you collect to inform your Developing Rural Services paper. You will find some specific information about needs assessments and a case example in Chapter 11 of Ginsberg. Use the following outline to organize your paper which should be about 6 pages with at least 5 professional references (this means academic journal articles and is in addition to the stakeholders you will speak with) and use correct APA style. Use the rubric criteria for headings in your paper to keep yourself focused. 1. Identify a local social concern/issue/problem. Describe why you believe this issue is important and how it has led to unmet services or access to services. What is the relevance to the profession of social work? 2. Plan your needs assessment. a. Identify Key Stakeholders – who will you collect data from? b. Determine the purpose of the Needs Assessment c. Identify the underlying theories/assumptions d. Determine required resources to complete the needs assessment e. Know the community – provide statistical data f. Choose the type of assessment 3. Conduct a basic needs assessment and share your findings. Do the people affected by the problem view the problem in the same way that you view the problem (See your answer to Question 1)? How does this compare to the viewpoint of key informants and the community at large? What needs are not currently being met in underserved rural areas according to the data you have collected? Please Note: In order to complete this assignment you will have to actually collect data from real people. So you should choose a topic and area that is accessible for you to complete data Click here to get this question answered.

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Respiratory protection devices are available in two basic design types

Posted on 2014-07-11 04:53:00


Respiratory protection devices are available in two basic design types: Air-Purifying Respirators (APR) and Supplied-Air Respirators (SAR). As a trained hazardous materials specialist, your employer asks you to evaluate each of the following four possible workplace conditions: Fiberglass components are being sanded smooth prior to painting by assembly line workers. A leak in a nitrogen supply line within a service closet requires repair but the supply of nitrogen cannot be interrupted. Hydrochloric acid vapor is escaping from a cylinder stored in an outdoor area. Oxygen levels are measured and found to be above 19.5%. A full 55-gallon drum of an organic solvent commonly used in the production process is releasing vapor. For each of the above four conditions: Select the preferred type of respiratory protection device. Identify which standardized OSHA filter color the device should be fitted with (if not applicable, so state). Explain your rationale for choosing the device type. Writing the Paper Must be three to four double-spaced pages in length (not including the title and reference pages), and formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center Must include a title page with the following Title of paper Student’s name Course name and number Instructor’s name Date submitted Must begin with an introductory paragraph that has a succinct thesis statement Must address the topic of the paper with critical thought Must end with a conclusion that reaffirms your thesis Must use at least four scholarly sources, including a minimum of two from the Ashford Online Library Must document all sources in APA style, as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center Must include a separate reference page, formatted according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center.Click here to get this question answered.

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